For even more of a representational focus, our typographic modern art prints use words, phrases or letters to provide embellishment. The options in this category range from sweet inspirational slogans to bold, stylized maps. You can enhance and anchor the tone of your room by selecting the prints that work best for your decor style. For a relaxed, inviting bedroom, our lovely handwritten typographic prints can match with some illustrated prints. If you want to create a sleek, modern atmosphere in your living room, you can opt for our angular typography art options and pair those with some geometric abstract prints.

Possibly one of the most recognisable Banksy artworks, Sweep it Under the Carpet appeared on a wall on Chalk Farm Road, North London in around 2006. It shows a woman dressed as a maid who is sweeping dirt under the cover of a brick wall. The piece is said to represent the reluctance of the western world to deal with global issues such as the AIDS epidemic, amongst others. Sweep it Under the Carpet – approx location
With CVS Photo, you can bring a gorgeous new aesthetic to your home or office in no time! Transform your walls with your very own customized wall art or canvas photo prints. Personalized art is a great way to display your taste and surround yourself with your most treasured people, places, pets, and things. We make it easy to create high quality art prints that will spruce up any room. You will be able to create unique and effortlessly elegant custom canvas prints or framed photos featuring pictures from your childhood, wedding, or favorite landscapes.
The introduction of a ‘stop and search’ policy allowing Police to search any young people they deemed may be up to no good was met with much criticism so it is no surprise to see Banksy weigh in on the debate. Policeman Searching Girl appeared in Glastonbury in 2007 showing a young girl with a teddy being frisked by a policeman. It has since been painted out.
For perhaps obvious reasons, digital reproductions can be frowned upon in the art world. Part of that is because they discourage originality—think of how many dorm rooms are decorated with a poster of Monet's Water-Lilies because the campus bookstore sells them for $10—but mostly it's just snobbery. Art prints aren't considered original art, so some people look down on them. [Insert extremely long pause here.] Are you wondering, Why the hell would I care if something's "original art" if it's cute and inexpensive and the artist is happy to sell it to me?? Well, same, thankfully. Lots of artists produce and sell art prints for way less than their originals as a way to make some cash flow but also to just get their art out in the world to more people. You're still supporting them by buying one of these if you can't afford the real thing! Once simply framed, digital prints can look super spiffy and finished in any room in your house. A gallery wall starts to look way more doable if you shop for art prints instead of originals! And you don't have to end up with some cheesy reproduction of an old-timey piece that hangs in the Louvre (those tend to be called "fine art prints" if you're trying to avoid them).

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Banksy's artistry lies in his ability to use humor and sardonic wit to trick viewers into contemplating the underlying seriousness of his messages about capitalism, advertising, politics, and humanity. It is this very sense of innocent whimsy coupled with daring, glaring truths about our times that lift him to a role as potent social mediator all under the guise of art.

Banksy is no stranger to controvery, but sometimes it is not the pieces of his art you would expect that prove to be the most divisive. Tox is one of those pieces. In June 2011, graffiti lover Daniel Halpin, aka Tox was convicted of tagging multiple locations over a three year period. The prosecution mocked him as ‘no Banksy’ due to a lack of artistry in his tagging. In response Banksy put up the piece which shows a little boy writing ‘Tox’ in bubbles. Opinion is split as to whether this is a show of solidarity or being used to poke fun at Halpin. Location of Tox.
Many works that make up the Better Out Than In series in New York City have been defaced, some just hours after the piece was unveiled.[185][186] At least one defacement was identified as done by a competing artist, OMAR NYC, who spray-painted over Banksy's red mylar balloon piece in Red Hook.[187] OMAR NYC also defaced some of Banksy's work in May 2010.[188][189]
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There exists a cult-like following for the artist. The ambiguity of his identity has drawn this group of followers. A concept, the "Banksy effect" has developed as a result of Banksy's artistic innovation. This term is in reference to the artist's ability to turn outsider art into the cultural mainstream.[154] It was coined to reference the way in which Banksy's work has led to an increased interest in street art. Street art has been incorporated into being a part of culture and daily life. His work in turn, has questioned the authenticity of art and its creators, furthering the cultural debate that has existed for centuries.[155]
Banksy's name and identity remain unconfirmed and the subject of speculation. In a 2003 interview with Simon Hattenstone of The Guardian, Banksy is described as "white, 28, scruffy casual – jeans, T-shirt, a silver tooth, silver chain and silver earring. He looks like a cross between Jimmy Nail and Mike Skinner of the Streets". He began as an artist at the age of 14, was expelled from school, and served time in prison for petty crime. According to Hattenstone, "anonymity is vital to him because graffiti is illegal".[10] For 10 years in the late 1990s, Banksy lived in Easton, Bristol, then moved to London around 2000.[11][12][13]
In March 2010, the work Forgive Us Our Trespassing was displayed at the London Bridge in conjunction with Art Below an arts company that put on art shows on the London Underground. The work was censored by the Transport for London (TfL), forbidding display of the work with its halo, because of the prevalence of graffiti in the underground.[87] It was displayed without the halo over the boy's head, but after a few days the halo was repainted by a graffitist, so the TfL disposed of the poster. This decline went through the press and several articles were published remarking on the progress of the poster.[87][88]
The Westminster City Council stated in October 2008 that the work One Nation Under CCTV, painted in April 2008 would be painted over as it was graffiti. The council said it would remove any graffiti, regardless of the reputation of its creator, and specifically stated that Banksy "has no more right to paint graffiti than a child". Robert Davis, the chairman of the council planning committee told The Times newspaper: "If we condone this then we might as well say that any kid with a spray can is producing art."[73] The work was painted over in April 2009. In December 2008, The Little Diver, a Banksy image of a diver in a duffle coat in Melbourne, Australia, was destroyed. The image had been protected by a sheet of clear perspex; however, silver paint was poured behind the protective sheet and later tagged with the words "Banksy woz ere". The image was almost completely obliterated.[74]

For even more of a representational focus, our typographic modern art prints use words, phrases or letters to provide embellishment. The options in this category range from sweet inspirational slogans to bold, stylized maps. You can enhance and anchor the tone of your room by selecting the prints that work best for your decor style. For a relaxed, inviting bedroom, our lovely handwritten typographic prints can match with some illustrated prints. If you want to create a sleek, modern atmosphere in your living room, you can opt for our angular typography art options and pair those with some geometric abstract prints.


By 2008, despite the global financial crash, a Banksy 'vandalised' version of a Damien Hirst painting sold for over $1.8m. High profile art collectors and celebrities spend thousands to own a Banksy. Among the rich and famous, designer Paul Smith, Brad Pitt and Angelina Jolie are known to be Banksy collectors. After claims that his success meant that he had sold out, Banksy said: “I love the way capitalism finds a place – even for its enemies. It’s boom time in the discontent industry.”
Both Mickey Mouse and Ronald McDonald are two family-friendly faces of American capitalism, the same country that dropped Napalm on Vietnam. Banksy's work then becomes a critique of not just America but also of capitalism. The girl's horror-stricken face is juxtaposed against the two characters' big, bright smiles. In this simple image, Banksy shows both the fun, carefree facade of American culture, and the reality that America also has a very dark, underbelly which drops bombs on people, and both commercializes and glamorizes war. Banksy once stated that "The greatest crimes in the world are not committed by people breaking the rules but by people following the rules. It's people who follow orders that drop bombs and massacre villages."
This was one of Banksy’s largest pieces, appearing in London in 2008. How he managed to pull this off is still something of a mystery because he erected 3 storeys of scaffolding (behind a security fence) seemingly under the watchful gaze of a CCTV camera, which was positioned just to the right of this shot. The message of the graffiti is heavily ironic, given the context. It has since been removed. One Nation Under CCTV location

If you're shopping for a gift, you can't go wrong with wall art. If you're not sure what kind of art the person you're buying for likes or how their home is decorated, something traditional in neutral tones is a good choice because it goes with everything. Wall decor is a great present for most any occasion, whether it's a birthday or holiday. However, you don't need a special reason to treat yourself or someone special to a beautiful piece of art.
The Thekla boat in Bristol was originally tagged by Banksy in 2003. The moored nightclub boat’s owners posted an image of the “tag” on their website and asked their customers whether it should stay. The response was to keep it, but Bristol City Council later ordered its removal. Years after its removal, Banksy returned and re-painted the Grim Reaper in the same spot where it remains to this day. Grim Reaper (Thekla) location 
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