Where can you position art and photography in a room? Almost anywhere is ideal. One thing to consider is what you want that particular piece to accomplish. Is it a showstopper, your favorite masterpiece? Then, you probably want it somewhere it gets noticed immediately, such as in the center of an accent wall. Above a fireplace is another spot where people tend to look right away when they walk into a room. Other artwork is complementary in nature. Each painting works together to create a harmonious arrangement in the whole room. These vignettes look beautiful on top of console tables, on bookshelves or hanging above furniture.
Social media was full of people ranting and raving, but I wanted to do something about it, so headed down with my ladders. It’s a three by four foot mural, but you need ladders to get up to the top. I was hoping the paint would still be wet, but water wouldn’t touch it. Loads of people were turning up to help, so I did the top on my ladders while a girl rubbed at the bottom. We tried white spirit. I didn’t even think “What if it brings off the Banksy?” which is stupid really, but gradually the picture came up underneath: it was magical.
In August 2004, Banksy produced a quantity of spoof British £10 notes replacing the picture of the Queen's head with Diana, Princess of Wales's head and changing the text "Bank of England" to "Banksy of England". Someone threw a large wad of these into a crowd at Notting Hill Carnival that year, which some recipients then tried to spend in local shops. These notes were also given with invitations to a Santa's Ghetto exhibition by Pictures on Walls. The individual notes have since been selling on eBay for about £200 each. A wad of the notes were also thrown over a fence and into the crowd near the NME signing tent at the Reading Festival. A limited run of 50 signed posters containing ten uncut notes were also produced and sold by Pictures on Walls for £100 each to commemorate the death of Princess Diana. One of these sold in October 2007 at Bonhams auction house in London for £24,000.[44]
The Westminster City Council stated in October 2008 that the work would be painted over, regardless of the celebrity status of the artist, as it was illegal graffiti. The council stated that Banksy "has no more right to paint graffiti than a child." Robert Davis, the chairman of the council planning committee told The Times, "If we condone this then we might as well say that any kid with a spray can is producing art." The work was eventually painted over in April 2009.
Old Skool has always been a firm favorite amongst fans of Banksy’s work. The piece was situated in London’s Clerkenwell Road and showed old people engaging in the type of loitering usually expected from young people! There was some degree of mystery surrounding the piece in 2008 when it was painted over and replaced with a cut out stencil saying “collected” There is some debate as to whether or not the work was removed from the wall or painted over.
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One of Banksy’s more ‘meaningful’ artworks, this was discovered in Fitzrovia (London) in April 2011. It features a rat with red paint on his paw and a paw print on the wall next to him. He stands under the phrase ‘If Graffiti Changed Anything It Would Be Illegal’. It appears to be a swipe at the government due to its reference to an Emma Goldman quote: ‘If voting ever changed anything, it would be illegal’. She campaigned for Women’s rights and voting, and Banksy could be highlighting the fact that each individual vote may rarely change anything. If Graffiti Changed Anything It Would Be Illegal location.

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Banksy's works have dealt with various political and social themes, including anti-war, anti-consumerism, anti-fascism, anti-imperialism, anti-authoritarianism, anarchism, nihilism, and existentialism. Additionally, the components of the human condition that his works commonly critique are greed, poverty, hypocrisy, boredom, despair, absurdity, and alienation.[192] Although Banksy's works usually rely on visual imagery and iconography to put forth their message, Banksy has made several politically related comments in their various books. In summarising his list of "people who should be shot", he listed "Fascist thugs, religious fundamentalists, (and) people who write lists telling you who should be shot."[193] While facetiously describing his political nature, Banksy declared that "Sometimes I feel so sick at the state of the world, I can't even finish my second apple pie."[194]
In April 2007, Transport for London painted over Banksy's image of a scene from Quentin Tarantino's film Pulp Fiction (1994), featuring Samuel L. Jackson and John Travolta clutching bananas instead of guns. Although the image was very popular, Transport for London claimed that the graffiti created "a general atmosphere of neglect and social decay which in turn encourages crime" and their staff are "professional cleaners not professional art critics".[58] Banksy painted the same site again and, initially, the actors were portrayed as holding real guns instead of bananas, but they were adorned with banana costumes. Some time later, Banksy made a tribute artwork over this second Pulp Fiction work. The tribute was for 19-year-old British graffiti artist Ozone who, along with fellow artist Wants, was hit by an underground train in Barking, east London on 12 January 2007.[59] Banksy depicted an angel wearing a bullet-proof vest holding a skull. They also wrote a note on their website saying:
Banksy painted the Grim Reaper on the waterside of the moored boat, so the only way he could have done it would have been by sailing out in a rowing boat or something, most likely under cover of darkness. The Reaper is quite large – a couple of metres, and because of its position, it was unlikely to ever be stolen. It wouldn’t just have caused a lot of attention in the harbour, but potentially have sunk the boat! It was probably more hassle than any vandal would be bothered with. But with it being so close to the waterline the big problem was deterioration.
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This particular Banksy lasted only 4 months from May 2008 to August 2008. It was created in Leake Street Tunnel (also known as Banksy Tunnel) a designated graffiti area. It was soon covered with other works, such is the ever changing nature of the tunnel. It is an ironic piece that showed ancient cave paintings being cleaned by a council worker, highlighting how art is often destroyed by those who don’t understand it. Is Banksy referencing the destruction of his own work?
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