On Limited, you’ll find emerging artists of note from around the world, such as Cécile van Hanja, Dean West, Jesús Perea, Denise Marts, and many others who have offered exclusive limited edition art prints of their original works. Each print is created using the finest museum quality archival paper and inks, so you can enjoy your artwork for many years to come. Your print will be accompanied with a signed and numbered Certificate of Authenticity. You’ll also have three framing options to choose from, each crafted from solid wood in black, white, and natural wood, so your artwork is ready-to-hang upon arrival.
The crazy thing is that at the time we were trying to sell the house, but couldn’t sell it because of the graffiti. People went, “We love the house, but we’re not buying it with all that stuff on the side.” Then we had this bright idea of selling the Banksy and throwing the house in for free as a publicity stunt for the urban art gallery Red Propeller we were starting.

When it comes to art, the word "print" can mean a lot of things. First, there's the real deal: lithographs, woodcuts, screenprints, and the like. Even though a printmaker might've produced 20 editions of such a work—that's the penciled-in 6/20 in the bottom corner you'll sometimes see—they also had to make the plate, block, or screen that it came from and then manually print each edition on a press. Sometimes they even tediously tear their own paper to get those amazing unfinished edges! So each one of their "prints" is considered an original work of art, and you'll have to pay for it accordingly. (This is why some original photography can be so expensive; you're actually buying a "silver gelatin print" that was first shot on a camera and then carefully crafted in a dark room.) If you can afford this kind of print, they're amazing pieces to display and collect and you'll be supporting storied artforms in the process. But the other kind of print is one that's specifically useful to know about if you're decorating on a budget, though it sometimes gets a bad rap: the digital reproduction.
“No Ball Games” first appeared in Turnpike Lane, North London, in 2009 but was later removed in July 2013 by a private organisation called “Sincura Group” in order to display it at the “Stealing Bansky” exhibition, a private collection of original Banksy works. Sincura Group have claimed that they have made no profit from the exhibition. The same group were also responsible for removing Banksy’s Slave Labour piece (see next item) which appeared close by in Wood Green in 2012. Banksy himself has made it clear he has no links with either the group or the exhibition. Banksy No Ball Games location.

“No Ball Games” first appeared in Turnpike Lane, North London, in 2009 but was later removed in July 2013 by a private organisation called “Sincura Group” in order to display it at the “Stealing Bansky” exhibition, a private collection of original Banksy works. Sincura Group have claimed that they have made no profit from the exhibition. The same group were also responsible for removing Banksy’s Slave Labour piece (see next item) which appeared close by in Wood Green in 2012. Banksy himself has made it clear he has no links with either the group or the exhibition. Banksy No Ball Games location.
Artwork description & Analysis: This more recent Banksy work serves as an excellent example of the way that "guerrilla" street artists use the surrounding environment as an integral part of their works. In this work, Banksy has stenciled a simple black silhouette of a child with a large mallet in the process of striking something in front of him. The pre-existing object that the boy is about to hit is a red fire hydrant, which has a pipe coming up through the top leading directly to a round red object several feet higher (possibly a fire alarm). With the inclusion of the small boy with the mallet, this utilitarian plumbing fixture is instantly transformed to look like a "high striker" or "strength tester" (the classic carnival game where a player must use a mallet to hit a lever at the bottom of a tower, with the goal of launching a small puck upwards to hit the bell at the top of the tower).
The introduction of a ‘stop and search’ policy allowing Police to search any young people they deemed may be up to no good was met with much criticism so it is no surprise to see Banksy weigh in on the debate. Policeman Searching Girl appeared in Glastonbury in 2007 showing a young girl with a teddy being frisked by a policeman. It has since been painted out.
Banksy held an exhibition called Barely Legal, billed as a "three-day vandalised warehouse extravaganza" in Los Angeles, on the weekend of 16 September 2006. The exhibition featured a live "elephant in a room", painted in a pink and gold floral wallpaper pattern, which, according to leaflets handed out at the exhibition, was intended to draw attention to the issue of world poverty. Although the Animal Services Department had issued a permit for the elephant, after complaints from animal rights activists, the elephant appeared unpainted on the final day. Its owners rejected claims of mistreatment and said that the elephant had done "many, many movies. She's used to makeup."[47] Banksy also made artwork displaying Queen Victoria as a lesbian and satirical pieces that incorporated art made by Andy Warhol and Leonardo da Vinci.[48]
Artwork can make or break the overall look of a room, so it's important to choose the right piece! You've got many factors to consider when choosing your new wall art: should it be silver and gray or vibrant and multicolor? Wooden or metal? Matte or shiny? By taking these options into account—and doing a thorough survey of the other decorations in the space—you're one step closer to finding that pivotal piece!
In 2003, at an exhibition called Turf War, held in a London warehouse, Banksy painted on animals. At the time he gave one of his very few interviews, to the BBC's Nigel Wrench.[41] Although the RSPCA declared the conditions suitable, an animal rights activist chained herself to the railings in protest.[42] An example of his subverted paintings is Monet's Water Lily Pond, adapted to include urban detritus such as litter and a shopping trolley floating in its reflective waters; another is Edward Hopper's Nighthawks, redrawn to show that the characters are looking at a British football hooligan, dressed only in his Union Flag underpants, who has just thrown an object through the glass window of the cafe. These oil paintings were shown at a twelve-day exhibition in Westbourne Grove, London in 2005.[43]
With this work, Banksy is drawing a parallel between the ancient, prehistoric cave paintings, and modern-day graffiti / street art. While it is standard practice for the latter to be cleaned off of walls, it would be unthinkable for the same fate to befall the former. In this way, the artist questions the value placed on certain works of art, and the label of "vandalism" assigned to others.
Because of the secretive nature of Banksy's work and identity, it is uncertain what techniques he uses to generate the images in the stencils, though it is assumed he uses computers for some images due to the photographic quality of much of his work. He mentions in his book Wall and Piece that as he was starting to do graffiti, he was always either caught or could never finish the art in one sitting. He claims he changed to stencilling while hiding from the police under a rubbish lorry, when he noticed the stencilled serial number. He then devised a series of intricate stencils to minimise time and overlapping of the colour.
If you prefer art that is more representational or quirky, the illustrations available in our collection of modern art prints may contain plenty of appealing options for you. From sweet botanical watercolors to pen-and-ink drawings rendered with the careful hand of an expert draftsman, our illustrated modern art prints can look great in any room in your house. You may even find some charming options for a sophisticated kid’s room or nursery that eschews generic pastel cuteness but still retains the fun of childhood.
Valid 2/14/19-2/18/19 at worldmarket.com. Not valid in store. Not valid on alcoholic beverages, gift cards, eGift Cards, Sackcloth and Ashes Blankets, delivery surcharges, and shipping fees. One-time use only. Cannot be combined with other coupons and offers. Discount will be applied to current selling price. Sweetened beverages may be subject to sweetened beverage tax recovery fee in certain locations. Employees not eligible. No adjustments to prior purchases. No cash value or rain checks issued. When you return an item, you will forfeit the discount applied to that item. To redeem online, enter promotion code PRESIDENT10 at checkout.
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