Because of the secretive nature of Banksy's work and identity, it is uncertain what techniques he uses to generate the images in the stencils, though it is assumed he uses computers for some images due to the photographic quality of much of his work. He mentions in his book Wall and Piece that as he was starting to do graffiti, he was always either caught or could never finish the art in one sitting. He claims he changed to stencilling while hiding from the police under a rubbish lorry, when he noticed the stencilled serial number. He then devised a series of intricate stencils to minimise time and overlapping of the colour. 

This is perhaps one of the most famous of all Banksy pieces and shows a man hanging from a window after his clandestine affair looks set to be discovered by his mistress’s husband. With typical Banksy irony, it was daubed on the side of a sexual health clinic in Frogmore Street, although according to the clinic’s director in the book “Home Sweet Home“, when Banksy was told this by email he responded to say that hadn’t realised it was a sexual health clinic and thought it was really funny. In the last few years the graffiti was unfortunately vandalised with blue paint, but it remains there to this day, albeit in the vandalised state. Man Hanging From Window location
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The Fine Art Paper we use is acid and lignin free, ensuring the image won't fade over time. The thickness of the paper, which is measured as a weight, is 230gsm (grams per square meter), and is roughly the thickness of 3 sheets of standard photocopy paper put together. This paper type has been selected because of its exceptional print quality, meaning we are able to reproduce high-resolution imagery at museum quality standards. We use digital Giclee printing on our fine art paper.


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Banksy held an exhibition called Barely Legal, billed as a "three-day vandalised warehouse extravaganza" in Los Angeles, on the weekend of 16 September 2006. The exhibition featured a live "elephant in a room", painted in a pink and gold floral wallpaper pattern, which, according to leaflets handed out at the exhibition, was intended to draw attention to the issue of world poverty. Although the Animal Services Department had issued a permit for the elephant, after complaints from animal rights activists, the elephant appeared unpainted on the final day. Its owners rejected claims of mistreatment and said that the elephant had done "many, many movies. She's used to makeup."[47] Banksy also made artwork displaying Queen Victoria as a lesbian and satirical pieces that incorporated art made by Andy Warhol and Leonardo da Vinci.[48]

I knew Looters was a controversial piece, so we protected it with plexiglass, which failed miserably. Other graffiti artists tagged it, people put placards over it; then it almost burned in a fire. Amazingly, a guy from the New Orleans fire department recognised it as a Banksy and protected it from the blaze. By then there were 11 layers of paint, paper and glue on top of the original work. After midnight one night we cut out that whole section of wall, put it on a tractor trailer and hauled it away for restoration. It took nearly four years after the fire to get back to the original paint. Banksy did 17 pieces in New Orleans – this is one of only three that survived. It’s currently in a warehouse, but we want to allow the piece to spread its message, so in March it goes on display at my International House hotel. We’re going to have to dismantle the entrance to get it in. It’s absurd, I know, but very Banksy.
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Digital oil painting gives your digital photos the look of a traditional oil painting. Each one is especially hand-designed by one of our skilled artists. Using a stylus and a specialized tablet. Use this technique to achieve the look of classic portraits from your digital pictures. Our museum quality will give your favorite pictures the look of the masters.
Banksy’s first London exhibition, so to speak, took place in Rivington Street in 2001, when he and fellow street artists convened in a tunnel near a pub. “We hung up some decorators’ signs nicked off a building site,” he later wrote, “and painted the walls white wearing overalls. We got the artwork up in 25 minutes and held an opening party later that week with beers and some hip-hop pumping out of the back of a Transit van. About 500 people turned up to an opening which had cost almost nothing to set up.”

The origins of this particular image are shroud in mystery, but it is thought that ‘The Thinker Monkey’ first appeared on canvas rather than on the streets. It seems that Banksy could be poking fun at humans for believing that they are the only intelligent beings, or perhaps it’s just a bit of a general laugh because you don’t see a monkey deep in thought every day!

Banksy’s ‘Gangsta Rat’ character has appeared at various locations, but perhaps the most well documented ‘Gangsta Rat’ is the one in the picture here, which was first spotted at Moorfields Eye Hospital in London in 2006. The rat, who is indeed looking rather ‘gangster’ with his chain and baseball cap, was later sold at auction. Gangsta Rat location (approximate).

In 2005, to comment on Israeli involvement in Palestine, Banksy travelled to the Middle East and targeted the West Bank wall. His satirical stencils criticised Israeli militarism and oppression. The works provoked fierce debate in the media over whether a wall judged to be “illegal” by the International Court of Justice could in fact be vandalised. Banksy described the wall as “the ultimate activity holiday destination for graffiti writers".
Once again Banksy has used existing feature to enhance his work. Here the double yellow lines of the road are extended across the pavement and up the wall where they bloom into a flower. The pavement lines have been removed and the painter’s face is mostly obscured with newer graffiti, but the flower is still clear. Yellow Lines Flower Painter location.
The people—and the apes and rats—he drew in these early days have a strange, primitive feel to them. My favorite is a piece that greets you when you enter the Pierced Up tattoo parlor in Bristol. The wall painting depicts giant wasps (with television sets strapped on as additional weapons) divebombing a tempting bunch of flowers in a vase. Parlor manager Maryanne Kemp recalls Banksy’s marathon painting session: “It was an all-nighter.”
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