During the United Kingdom general election, 2017, Banksy offered voters a free print if they cast a ballot against the Conservative candidates standing in the Bristol North West, Bristol West, North Somerset, Thornbury, Kingswood and Filton constituencies.[195] According to a note posted on Banksy's website, an emailed photo of a completed ballot paper showing it marked for a candidate other than the Conservative candidate would result in the voter being mailed a limited edition piece of Banksy art. On 5 June 2017 the Avon and Somerset Constabulary announced it had opened an investigation into Banksy for the suspected corrupt practice of bribery,[196] and the following day Banksy withdrew the offer stating "I have been warned by the Electoral Commission that the free print offer will invalidate the election result. So I regret to announce that this ill-conceived and legally dubious promotion has now been cancelled."[197]
In March, a stencilled graffiti work appeared on Thames Water tower in the middle of the Holland Park roundabout, and it was widely attributed to Banksy. It was of a child painting the tag "Take this—Society!" in bright orange. London Borough of Hammersmith and Fulham spokesman, Councillor Greg Smith branded the art as vandalism, and ordered its immediate removal, which was carried out by H&F council workmen within three days.[69]

This Banksy work was found in Hastings and depicts a young child building sandcastles. This in itself is not controversial, but when we notice that Tesco is printed on the sandcastles it takes on a new meaning. Consumerism is a common theme in Banksy’s work and here he seems to be indicating that the supermarket giant is taking over the country! The artwork is still visible on the Sea wall although it has been defaced by other graffitti artists. Approximate location of Tesco Sandcastle.
Banksy is no stranger to controvery, but sometimes it is not the pieces of his art you would expect that prove to be the most divisive. Tox is one of those pieces. In June 2011, graffiti lover Daniel Halpin, aka Tox was convicted of tagging multiple locations over a three year period. The prosecution mocked him as ‘no Banksy’ due to a lack of artistry in his tagging. In response Banksy put up the piece which shows a little boy writing ‘Tox’ in bubbles. Opinion is split as to whether this is a show of solidarity or being used to poke fun at Halpin. Location of Tox.
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Banksy is well known for his use of rats and this particular example discovered in Wall street in 2008 is a great example. In a play on the famous quote attributed to Marie Antoinette, he proclaimss “let them eat crack” in commentary on the public outrage at how financial matters were being handled around the time. Needless to say it was soon painted over!
There exists a cult-like following for the artist. The ambiguity of his identity has drawn this group of followers. A concept, the "Banksy effect" has developed as a result of Banksy's artistic innovation. This term is in reference to the artist's ability to turn outsider art into the cultural mainstream.[154] It was coined to reference the way in which Banksy's work has led to an increased interest in street art. Street art has been incorporated into being a part of culture and daily life. His work in turn, has questioned the authenticity of art and its creators, furthering the cultural debate that has existed for centuries.[155]
This was one of Banksy’s largest pieces, appearing in London in 2008. How he managed to pull this off is still something of a mystery because he erected 3 storeys of scaffolding (behind a security fence) seemingly under the watchful gaze of a CCTV camera, which was positioned just to the right of this shot. The message of the graffiti is heavily ironic, given the context. It has since been removed. One Nation Under CCTV location
By 2008, despite the global financial crash, a Banksy 'vandalised' version of a Damien Hirst painting sold for over $1.8m. High profile art collectors and celebrities spend thousands to own a Banksy. Among the rich and famous, designer Paul Smith, Brad Pitt and Angelina Jolie are known to be Banksy collectors. After claims that his success meant that he had sold out, Banksy said: “I love the way capitalism finds a place – even for its enemies. It’s boom time in the discontent industry.”
An obvious place to begin is with color. One trick of the trade many designers use it to pull an accent color from the rug, window treatments, or upholstery to work into artwork on the walls. In this way, everything in the room is subtly unified, even if you're layering with lots of patterns or experimenting with several different hues at once. Try purple wall art that speaks to the sheer curtains on the windows; violet poppies make this warm shade sing, especially when the floral plaques themselves are placed on an opposite wall.
This piece plays on the notion that the grass may be greener, and the landscape (perhaps environmental, perhaps political) may be better on the other side of this large barrier (although we know that it isn't). The artist may also be suggesting that a better political landscape could only emerge if the barrier were destroyed. By including children in this, and several others of the murals on the wall, the artist forces us to consider the toll that the local conflict takes on the innocent. The viewer is even more strongly implicated in the work through the direct gaze of the children.
There is some debate over whether or not Secured is actually a genuine Banksy artwork. It appeared on a boarded up window of a building in Concert Street, Liverpool and pokes fun at companies who use cheap migrant workers for jobs such as security guards. The full text reads “Secured – by sleepy migrant workers on minimum wage”. The board was exhibited at the Stealing Banksy exhibition, but as this was not done in partnership with Banksy and none of that displayed artworks were authenticated by Banksy or his representative Pest Control this does not prove that this is a genuine Banksy. Secured location
When it comes to art, the word "print" can mean a lot of things. First, there's the real deal: lithographs, woodcuts, screenprints, and the like. Even though a printmaker might've produced 20 editions of such a work—that's the penciled-in 6/20 in the bottom corner you'll sometimes see—they also had to make the plate, block, or screen that it came from and then manually print each edition on a press. Sometimes they even tediously tear their own paper to get those amazing unfinished edges! So each one of their "prints" is considered an original work of art, and you'll have to pay for it accordingly. (This is why some original photography can be so expensive; you're actually buying a "silver gelatin print" that was first shot on a camera and then carefully crafted in a dark room.) If you can afford this kind of print, they're amazing pieces to display and collect and you'll be supporting storied artforms in the process. But the other kind of print is one that's specifically useful to know about if you're decorating on a budget, though it sometimes gets a bad rap: the digital reproduction.

While Banksy's juxtaposition of art history's most famous female with a powerful modern weapon may certainly be humorous and cheeky, there is more that can be read into the image. While Da Vinci's Mona Lisa appears graceful and passive, Banksy gives her a powerful, confrontational, and active sensibility. Her facial expression remains just as calm as in the original, however, next to the powerful weapon, her welcoming smile reads as slightly menacing. It can also be read as a statement on how blasé citizens have become to the ongoing realities of war, always taking place somewhere far removed from their own tranquil lives.
Have you been looking for ways to decorate your walls? Wall art is the perfect solution for small or large spaces alike, giving any room a finished and polished look in minutes. If you need inspiration for decorating your walls before you make your purchase, you can read our handy inspirational guide on wall decor here. If you are ready to make your wall art purchase and know exactly what you want, you can browse through our large selection of wall art to find the perfect piece for your home. Whether you need bedroom wall art, kitchen wall art, or any room in between, we've got what you need to turn your home into a beautifully decorated space. The modern art, vintage art, or reproductions of the classics you love are just a click away. Here are a few examples of wall art you will find right here, at Wayfair.
The right classy metal wall art can really be a conversation starter and the centerpiece to a complete design and décor scheme. There are few better ways to set off or accent your room, whether you're giving an old room a fresh facelift or you're moving into a brand-new home or apartment and looking for a way to really make each room pop. These affordable and varied designs are the way to go.
Artwork description & Analysis: This mural was created in May 2008 on Leake Street, London, as part of the Cans Festival. It depicts a maintenance worker in an orange vest in the act of pressure washing art off of a wall. The art appears to be ancient cave paintings of warriors and animals (horses, deer, and or bison), much like the famous discovery in the caves at Lascaux, France.
Artwork can make or break the overall look of a room, so it's important to choose the right piece! You've got many factors to consider when choosing your new wall art: should it be silver and gray or vibrant and multicolor? Wooden or metal? Matte or shiny? By taking these options into account—and doing a thorough survey of the other decorations in the space—you're one step closer to finding that pivotal piece!
The Mild Mild West (1999) Pulp Fiction Gorilla in a Pink Mask Bombing Middle England Girl with Balloon (2002) Bomb Hugger Ballerina with Action Man Parts Parachuting Rat (2003) Untitled (2004) Fragile Silence Well Hung Lover (2006) Self Portrait Space Girl and Bird The Drinker One Nation Under CCTV (2008) Forgive Us Our Trespassing Cardinal Sin (2011) Slave Labour (2012) Better Out Than In (2013) Art Buff (2014) Spy Booth (2014) The Son of a Migrant from Syria (2015) Civilian Drone Strike (2017) Love is in the Bin (2018)

Banksy enjoys putting people and objects in unexpected scenarios and here the usually menacing stormtroopers appear somewhat comical in their setting as camera man an presenters. It seems fitting that this piece was part of a larger mural found in Hollywood – home of the movies! There is still some debate over whether or not this is in fact a Banksy or the work of another artists going by ‘Mr Brainwash’.


For perhaps obvious reasons, digital reproductions can be frowned upon in the art world. Part of that is because they discourage originality—think of how many dorm rooms are decorated with a poster of Monet's Water-Lilies because the campus bookstore sells them for $10—but mostly it's just snobbery. Art prints aren't considered original art, so some people look down on them. [Insert extremely long pause here.] Are you wondering, Why the hell would I care if something's "original art" if it's cute and inexpensive and the artist is happy to sell it to me?? Well, same, thankfully. Lots of artists produce and sell art prints for way less than their originals as a way to make some cash flow but also to just get their art out in the world to more people. You're still supporting them by buying one of these if you can't afford the real thing! Once simply framed, digital prints can look super spiffy and finished in any room in your house. A gallery wall starts to look way more doable if you shop for art prints instead of originals! And you don't have to end up with some cheesy reproduction of an old-timey piece that hangs in the Louvre (those tend to be called "fine art prints" if you're trying to avoid them).
This Banksy work was found in Hastings and depicts a young child building sandcastles. This in itself is not controversial, but when we notice that Tesco is printed on the sandcastles it takes on a new meaning. Consumerism is a common theme in Banksy’s work and here he seems to be indicating that the supermarket giant is taking over the country! The artwork is still visible on the Sea wall although it has been defaced by other graffitti artists. Approximate location of Tesco Sandcastle.
The Mona Lisa is perhaps the most famous painting of all time, and it is also one which is often parodied. Banksy is no exception. This re-imagining of Mona Lisa as a terrorist toting a rocket launcher appeared in London. It has been spotted in various locations, but it is unclear as to whether these are copies or if they all belong to the elusive Banksy.
“No Ball Games” first appeared in Turnpike Lane, North London, in 2009 but was later removed in July 2013 by a private organisation called “Sincura Group” in order to display it at the “Stealing Bansky” exhibition, a private collection of original Banksy works. Sincura Group have claimed that they have made no profit from the exhibition. The same group were also responsible for removing Banksy’s Slave Labour piece (see next item) which appeared close by in Wood Green in 2012. Banksy himself has made it clear he has no links with either the group or the exhibition. Banksy No Ball Games location.
Categories: BanksyLiving people20th-century English paintersEnglish male painters21st-century English paintersArtists from BristolCulture jammingEnglish activistsEnglish contemporary artistsEnglish film directorsEnglish graffiti artistsEnglish satiristsGuerilla artistsPolitical artistsPseudonymous artistsStreet artistsAnti-consumeristsUnidentified peoplePranksters

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Possibly one of the most recognisable Banksy artworks, Sweep it Under the Carpet appeared on a wall on Chalk Farm Road, North London in around 2006. It shows a woman dressed as a maid who is sweeping dirt under the cover of a brick wall. The piece is said to represent the reluctance of the western world to deal with global issues such as the AIDS epidemic, amongst others. Sweep it Under the Carpet – approx location
Breathe life into your walls! Give your decor a unique touch with our posters and prints, and allow our poster art to take center stage. Put a personal stamp on your home, and let the posters and prints you pick reflect who you are as a person or something you like. Easily create an attractive gallery by combining several different posters in a collage. Check out our Inspiration category to see popular gallery walls that feature our chic posters.
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