With site-specific works like Hammer Boy, Banksy and other street artists encourage viewers to envision urban spaces, surfaces, and objects differently, and to see fun and whimsy in otherwise mundane spaces. In this way, street artists have much the same mentality as skateboarders or people who practice parkour. For all of these groups, city spaces and surfaces are not restricted to their prescribed uses. Instead, participants feel the freedom to co-opt and repurpose the urban environment. A fire hydrant is not just for holding water, it can also become a child's plaything. A handrail is not only for holding and supporting oneself, it can also become a tool for enacting daring acrobatic feats.
This piece plays on the notion that the grass may be greener, and the landscape (perhaps environmental, perhaps political) may be better on the other side of this large barrier (although we know that it isn't). The artist may also be suggesting that a better political landscape could only emerge if the barrier were destroyed. By including children in this, and several others of the murals on the wall, the artist forces us to consider the toll that the local conflict takes on the innocent. The viewer is even more strongly implicated in the work through the direct gaze of the children.
This “Snorting Copper” stencil began appearing from 2005 in several places in London, including behind Waterloo Station (Leake Street) as well as in Shoreditch (Curtain Street). The artworks also included several miles of paint “dribble” which trailed through the city and led to the stencil representing a ‘line’ of coke. This piece by Banksy is unquestionably a dig at the immorality and corruption sometimes prevalent in the police force. Perhaps not too surprisingly, this piece was removed. Snorting Copper – approx location (Leake Street)

In June 2006, Banksy created Well Hung Lover, an image of a naked man hanging out of a bedroom window on a wall visible from Park Street in central Bristol. The image sparked "a heated debate",[168] with the Bristol City Council leaving it up to the public to decide whether it should stay or go.[169] After an internet discussion in which 97% of the 500 people surveyed supported the stencil, the city council decided it would be left on the building.[168] The mural was later defaced with blue paint.[170]
In the run up to the London 2012 Olympics, Banksy created 2 Olympic themed artworks. This one known as ‘Welcome to Hackney’ or ‘Javelin Thrower’ shows an athlete throwing a missile. This is in protest of the decision to add surface to air missile launchers on top of some residential tower blocks in the city as part of the security measures during the games. The location was closely guarded to avoid it being removed.

Comics & manga Fantasy & Sci Fi Fashion Flowers Food & drink Geography & locale Horror & gothic Humorous saying Inspirational saying Landscape & scenery LGBTQ pride Love & friendship Military Movie Music Nautical Nudes Patriotic & flags People & portrait Pet portrait Phrase & saying Plants & trees Religious Science & tech Sports & fitness Stars & celestial Steampunk Superhero Travel & transportation TV Video game Western & cowboy Zodiac
According to some sources, his real name would be Robin or Robert Banks but, again, nothing is certain. Banksy insists stubbornly on remaining anonymous, as the graffiti’s spirit that involves creating artworks in the purest secret. His art is a mixture of irony, irreverence, humor and often contains very clear messages, in the context where they are not interpreted literally.

Collage.com offers museum-quality canvas prints with a sturdy frame and professional construction so your photos will last for years to come. Choose from a variety of different sizes. Our 5x7 and 8x10 canvases each have a 0.5” thick wrap and include a tabletop stand. All other canvas sizes have a 1.25” thick wrap. A solid black matboard enclosure provides a dust cover and added durability.

In December 2009, Banksy marked the end of the 2009 United Nations Climate Change Conference by painting four murals on global warming. One included the phrase, "I don't believe in global warming;" the words were submerged in water.[83] A feud and graffiti war between Banksy and King Robbo broke out when Banksy allegedly painted over one of Robbo's tags. The feud has led to many of Banksy's works being altered by graffiti writers.[84]
The Fine Art Paper we use is acid and lignin free, ensuring the image won't fade over time. The thickness of the paper, which is measured as a weight, is 230gsm (grams per square meter), and is roughly the thickness of 3 sheets of standard photocopy paper put together. This paper type has been selected because of its exceptional print quality, meaning we are able to reproduce high-resolution imagery at museum quality standards. We use digital Giclee printing on our fine art paper.
Government Spies appeared on the side of a house in Cheltenham in April 2014. The mural depicts mysterious 1950’s style  agents listening in on a telephone box in reference to former CIA agent Edward Snowdon exposed techniques used by several agencies. The house on which the mural was painted is close to GCHQ (Government Communications Headquarters) which is the UK equivalent of America’s NSA. The piece was sold by the home owner to a private collector who is preparing to remove the mural, but as of 2 July the local council have placed a stop order on the work for one month. Government Spies Location.
In August/September 2006, Banksy placed up to 500 copies of Paris Hilton's debut CD, Paris, in 48 different UK record stores with his own cover art and remixes by Danger Mouse. Music tracks were given titles such as "Why Am I Famous?", "What Have I Done?" and "What Am I For?". Several copies of the CD were purchased by the public before stores were able to remove them, some going on to be sold for as much as £750 on online auction websites such as eBay. The cover art depicted Hilton digitally altered to appear topless. Other pictures feature her with her chihuahua Tinkerbell's head replacing her own, and one of her stepping out of a luxury car, edited to include a group of homeless people, which included the caption "90% of success is just showing up."[171][172][173]
The Thekla boat in Bristol was originally tagged by Banksy in 2003. The moored nightclub boat’s owners posted an image of the “tag” on their website and asked their customers whether it should stay. The response was to keep it, but Bristol City Council later ordered its removal. Years after its removal, Banksy returned and re-painted the Grim Reaper in the same spot where it remains to this day. Grim Reaper (Thekla) location
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