The origins of this particular image are shroud in mystery, but it is thought that ‘The Thinker Monkey’ first appeared on canvas rather than on the streets. It seems that Banksy could be poking fun at humans for believing that they are the only intelligent beings, or perhaps it’s just a bit of a general laugh because you don’t see a monkey deep in thought every day!

In October 2018, one of Banksy's works, Balloon Girl, was sold in an auction at Sotheby's in London for £1.04m. However, shortly after the gavel dropped and it was sold, an alarm sounded inside of the picture frame and the canvas passed through a shredder hidden within the frame, partially shredding the picture.[134] Banksy then posted an image of the shredding on Instagram captioned "Going, going, gone...".[135] After the sale, the auction house acknowledged that the self-destruction of the work was a prank by the artist.[136] The prank received wide news coverage around the world, with one newspaper stating that it was "quite possibly the biggest prank in art history."[134] Joey Syer, co-founder of an online platform facilitating art dealer sales,[137] told the Evening Standard: "The auction result will only propel this further and given the media attention this stunt has received, the lucky buyer would see a great return on the £1.02M they paid last night, this is now part of art history in its shredded state and we'd estimate Banksy has added at a minimum 50% to its value, possibly as high as being worth £2m+."[138] A man seen filming the shredding of the picture during its auction has been suggested to be Banksy.[139][140] Banksy has since released a video on how the shredder was installed into the frame and the shredding of the picture, explaining that he had surreptitiously fitted the painting with the shredder a few years previously, in case it ever went up for auction. To explain his rationale for destroying his own artwork, Banksy quoted Picasso: "The urge to destroy is also a creative urge".[141][142] (Although Banksy cited Picasso, this quote is usually attributed to Mikhail Bakunin.) [143] It is not known how the shredder was activated.[144] Banksy has released another video indicating that the painting was intended to be shredded completely. The video shows a sample painting completely shredded by the frame and says: "In rehearsals it worked every time...".[145]
An eye-catching stencil by Banksy depicting a girl being grabbed by the robotic arm of a cash machine, this piece of work has been revisited by Banksy and is reported to have first appeared in its current state in May 2007 close to Exmouth Market in North London. The message appears to be anti-capitalist, with Banksy perhaps taking a swipe at high street banks luring customers in. Cash Machine Girl location.
He loves to provoke, shock even to disturb society and that is why his work is so important. Despite his ability to break the rules, he remains to this day a mystery since his true identity has never been revealed. In all likelihood, Banksy is a Street art graffiti artist from Bristol, England. Philanthropist, anti-war and revolutionary, the artist uses his art as a medium for communication to say loud and clear his dissatisfaction with certain social phenomena, certain political situations or outright certain decisions adopted by world leaders. Born tentatively in 1974, it was not until the 1980s that he began to handle the aerosol, after completing a butcher training. But it was between 1992 and 1994 he became truly a graffiti artist, as part of a group called the Bristol's DrybreadZ Crew (DBZ), assisting his colleagues Kato and Tes.

This was one of Banksy’s largest pieces, appearing in London in 2008. How he managed to pull this off is still something of a mystery because he erected 3 storeys of scaffolding (behind a security fence) seemingly under the watchful gaze of a CCTV camera, which was positioned just to the right of this shot. The message of the graffiti is heavily ironic, given the context. It has since been removed. One Nation Under CCTV location
He has become a brand in himself and for some younger graffiti writers Banksy is fair game. The mischievous, anonymous outsider taking shots at the establishment is now a part of Britain's art scene. Councils are quick to restore and protect works that previously they would have scrubbed away as vandalism. He has kept his identity secret for years and built a cult around his name. He still manages to walk the tightrope between maverick and mainstream but how long can he maintain that position?

Rather than using a free-hand painting style like most graffiti writers, Blek used stencils to create images. Banksy adopted this technique for practical reasons: “I was quite crap with a spray can, so I started cutting out stencils instead.” Blek influenced Banksy and inspired him to develop the anti-establishment views he grew up with in Bristol. Armed with a new visual style, Banksy pursued more political targets with his work.


A Banksy called Mobile Lovers appeared on the door of a cash-strapped Bristol boys’ club. A row broke out when the council claimed ownership. Banksy intervened when he wrote to the club to support their claim and the club later sold the door for £400,000 which saved it from closure. Bansky's art can now cause tension when it appears in communities as locals see them as gifts to their area – if anyone should profit from selling a Banksy it should be them.
Banksy is usually most well known for his 2 dimensional graffiti art, but from time to time his installations also cause something of a stir. This broken telephone box appeared overnight in a Soho street complete with an axe and pool of blood. The piece featured in Banksy’s “Exit Throguh The Gift Shop” film, but did it represent the death of phone communication thanks to the birth of social media or did BT get it right when the embraced the work as a representation of their change away from the iconic red phoneboxes to a more modern design.
Need something that will really stand out against your deep charcoal walls? Pick out white wall art featuring textured starfish or even a mermaid perched on a crescent moon. You can also find mirror art wall decor to help lighten the heavy feeling in a dark space. A small mirror radiating crisscrossing lines adorned with clear acrylic gems is just the thing for your foyer. Simply hang it over a console table finished in antique white for a vignette that straddles contemporary cool and traditional poise.
This item arrived yesterday and was packed well. It was in perfect condition upon removal from the large, flat box. I was surprised at the color of the metal, as I was expecting it to be silver tone. The spikes of the starburst are dark metal, nearly black - that doesn't come through on the picture here. The glass beads are more like large, flat, faceted rhinestones. All in all, a very pretty item. I will keep it, it will be in a grouping of 3 starbursts so it will still look great in my living room.
Banksy once characterised graffiti as a form of underclass "revenge", or guerilla warfare that allows an individual to snatch away power, territory and glory from a bigger and better equipped enemy.[45] Banksy sees a social class component to this struggle, remarking "If you don't own a train company then you go and paint on one instead."[45] Banksy's work has also shown a desire to mock centralised power, hoping that their work will show the public that although power does exist and works against you, that power is not terribly efficient and it can and should be deceived.[45]
There exists a debate about the influence behind his work. Some critics claim Banksy was influenced by musician and graffiti artist 3D. Another source credits the artist's work to resemble that of French graffiti artist called Blek le Rat. It is said that Banksy was inspired by their use of stencils, later taking this visual style and transforming it through modern political and social pieces.[190]
The condemning of street art as illegal vandalism, and its frequent removal, has been the focus of many other works by Banksy. But on the other hand, the fact that many of his works get removed shortly after their creation adds to the excitement and fanaticism that surrounds Banksy's work. Banksy biographer Will Ellsworth-Jones wrote in 2013 that Banksy "is an artist who has got people running around the city desperate to see his work before it gets painted over."
Small or large, wall art for the living room has a transformative effect the moment you hang it up. Find metal art that adds a hint of luster to your decor, especially if it's dominated by flat fabrics and matte surfaces. Otherwise, wooden wall art lends a natural vibe, such as that found in handcarved fruitwood geese or an abstract collection of panels. Not reflecting as much light, they're ideal for an area with glossy bed linens or sequined lampshades.

Just like with the classic art canvas found in galleries around the world, the canvas photo print of your choice is stretched to fit the frame perfectly. When preparing your chosen photo, make sure that the elements you most want to see in the final product aren’t too close to the margins, otherwise they may not be displayed properly on the finished canvas!
As the feud developed, Banksy painted over work by King Robbo, one of London’s earliest graffiti writers. Painting over the work of a fellow graffiti writer was seen as unforgivable and Robbo’s crew responded by defacing the new Banksy. A tit-for-tat war ensued – even continuing after Robbo’s untimely death - as his crew continued to target Banksy works across the capital. Robbo’s largely urban, underground, working class team saw Banksy as a mainstream, middle class imposter.
In one of the more unusually-placed positions, the white-stencilled words “This is not a Photo Opportunity” appear approximately 40 metres up a steep, rocky path just off Cliff Road (B3135) in the picturesque Cheddar Gorge in Somerset. It first appeared in around 2004 and although it has weathered significantly since then it’s outline is still visible. This is not a Photo Opportunity – approx location
Banksy has published a "manifesto" on his website.[65] The text of the manifesto is credited as the diary entry of British Lieutenant Colonel Mervin Willett Gonin, DSO, which is exhibited in the Imperial War Museum. It describes how a shipment of lipstick to the Bergen-Belsen concentration camp immediately after its liberation at the end of World War II helped the internees regain their humanity. However, as of 18 January 2008, Banksy's Manifesto has been replaced with Graffiti Heroes No. 03, which describes Peter Chappell's graffiti quest of the 1970s that worked to free George Davis from imprisonment.[65] By 12 August 2009 he was relying on Emo Philips' "When I was a kid I used to pray every night for a new bicycle. Then I realised God doesn't work that way, so I stole one and prayed for forgiveness." A small number of Banksy's works can be seen in the movie Children of Men, including a stenciled image of two policemen kissing and another stencil of a child looking down a shop.[66]
In December 2009, Banksy marked the end of the 2009 United Nations Climate Change Conference by painting four murals on global warming. One included the phrase, "I don't believe in global warming;" the words were submerged in water.[83] A feud and graffiti war between Banksy and King Robbo broke out when Banksy allegedly painted over one of Robbo's tags. The feud has led to many of Banksy's works being altered by graffiti writers.[84]
This particular Banksy lasted only 4 months from May 2008 to August 2008. It was created in Leake Street Tunnel (also known as Banksy Tunnel) a designated graffiti area. It was soon covered with other works, such is the ever changing nature of the tunnel. It is an ironic piece that showed ancient cave paintings being cleaned by a council worker, highlighting how art is often destroyed by those who don’t understand it. Is Banksy referencing the destruction of his own work?
It was reported that then-New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg called Banksy a vandal whose work is not the definition of art, and that the NYPD's vandal squad was on the hunt for Banksy over his various graffiti art and installations.[114][115][116] One creation was a fiberglass sculpture of Ronald McDonald and a real person, barefoot and in ragged clothes, shining the oversized shoes of Ronald McDonald. The sculpture was unveiled in Queens but moved outside a different McDonald's around the city every day.[117][118][119] Other works included a YouTube video showing what appears to be footage of jihadist militants shooting down an animated Dumbo; travelling installations that toured the city including a slaughterhouse delivery truck full of stuffed animals and a waterfall; and a modified painting donated to a charity shop which was later sold in an online auction for $615,000.[120][121] Banksy also posted a mock-up of a New York Times op-ed attacking the design of the One World Trade Center after the Times rejected his submission.[122][123] The residency in New York concluded on 31 October 2013;[120][124] many of the pieces, though, were either vandalised, removed or stolen.[125]
By using shopping carts, an image associated with consumerism, Banksy's message is that society is focused on material goods, buying more than is necessary in a futile attempt to make ourselves feel happy and fulfilled. Moreover, by representing these man-made objects as discarded in an otherwise beautiful natural setting, he critiques contemporary society's disregard for nature in favor of commodity fetishism and the production of excessive waste, Even the title of Banksy's work has subverted the meaning of the original, with the word money being a play on Monet, which can be read as a critique of the commercialization of art.
Located in a car park on Broadway, Downtown LA, Swing Girl is another example of Banksy making use of what was already there. The ‘ing’ portion of the parking sign have been whitewashed out to form park and a girl on a swing added to the letter A. It seems clear that it is a comment on how there is a lack of places for kids to play safely in what is a fairly rough area of LA. The artwork appeared in 2010 a few days prior to the LA première of Banksy’s film Exit Through The Gift Shop. Swing Girl location
Another of Banksy’s New Orleans works sees a realistic version of Bart Simpson writing lines as seen in the title sequence of The Simpsons cartoon series. The work seems almost prophetic given that Banksy went on to create an opening sequence for the show later. New Orleans is protective of Banksy and the piece is covered by a board. Location of I Must Not Copy What I See On The Simpsons.
Another of Banksy’s New Orleans works sees a realistic version of Bart Simpson writing lines as seen in the title sequence of The Simpsons cartoon series. The work seems almost prophetic given that Banksy went on to create an opening sequence for the show later. New Orleans is protective of Banksy and the piece is covered by a board. Location of I Must Not Copy What I See On The Simpsons.
Banksy is an anonymous England-based street artist, vandal, political activist, and film director.[1] His satirical street art and subversive epigrams combine dark humour with graffiti executed in a distinctive stenciling technique. His works of political and social commentary have been featured on streets, walls, and bridges of cities throughout the world.[2] Banksy's work grew out of the Bristol underground scene, which involved collaborations between artists and musicians.[3] Banksy says that he was inspired by 3D, a graffiti artist who later became a founding member of the English musical group Massive Attack.[4]
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