A Banksy called Mobile Lovers appeared on the door of a cash-strapped Bristol boys’ club. A row broke out when the council claimed ownership. Banksy intervened when he wrote to the club to support their claim and the club later sold the door for £400,000 which saved it from closure. Bansky's art can now cause tension when it appears in communities as locals see them as gifts to their area – if anyone should profit from selling a Banksy it should be them.
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With tongue firmly planted in cheek, English graffiti artist and international prankster Banksy has managed to become one of the world's most recognized artists while remaining relatively anonymous. Staying true to the credos of street art, he's built a celebrated body of work, both permanent and impermanent, that utilizes satire, subversion, dark humor, and irony to create resonant social, political, and humanist messages for the masses on a populous and public level. His style is universally familiar, founded on a signature stencil aesthetic that has elevated him from mere man with a spray can to a highly creative artist in his own right. He is responsible for catapulting guerilla work into the mainstream as a viable form of art.
By using shopping carts, an image associated with consumerism, Banksy's message is that society is focused on material goods, buying more than is necessary in a futile attempt to make ourselves feel happy and fulfilled. Moreover, by representing these man-made objects as discarded in an otherwise beautiful natural setting, he critiques contemporary society's disregard for nature in favor of commodity fetishism and the production of excessive waste, Even the title of Banksy's work has subverted the meaning of the original, with the word money being a play on Monet, which can be read as a critique of the commercialization of art.
Jason Fanthorpe, window cleaner: I live two miles from Scott Street bridge and one night one of the local Facebook groups was buzzing with the news that Banksy had painted it. I’m a keen photographer, so got straight down there. It was an ace atmosphere, with busloads of people arriving and taxi drivers bringing people to see it. I had a tingly feeling looking at the mural, and the thought that Banksy had been to Hull and left a political message about Brexit and division on a disused/raised bridge that separates two halves of the city.

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Social media was full of people ranting and raving, but I wanted to do something about it, so headed down with my ladders. It’s a three by four foot mural, but you need ladders to get up to the top. I was hoping the paint would still be wet, but water wouldn’t touch it. Loads of people were turning up to help, so I did the top on my ladders while a girl rubbed at the bottom. We tried white spirit. I didn’t even think “What if it brings off the Banksy?” which is stupid really, but gradually the picture came up underneath: it was magical.
In May, to coincide with the premiere of Exit Through the Gift Shop in Royal Oak, Banksy visited the Detroit area and left his mark in several places in Detroit and Warren.[93] Shortly after, his work depicting a little boy holding a can of red paint next to the words "I remember when all this was trees" was excavated by the 555 Nonprofit Gallery and Studios. They claim that they do not intend to sell the work but plan to preserve it and display it at their Detroit gallery.[94] There was also an attempted removal of one of the Warren works known as Diamond Girl.[95]

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On 27 April 2007, a new record high for the sale of Banksy's work was set with the auction of the work Space Girl and Bird fetching £288,000 (US$576,000) around 20 times the estimate at Bonhams of London.[61] On 21 May 2007 Banksy gained the award for Art's Greatest living Briton. Banksy, as expected, did not turn up to collect his award and continued with his anonymous status. On 4 June 2007, it was reported that Banksy's The Drinker had been stolen.[62][63] In October 2007, most of his works offered for sale at Bonhams auction house in London sold for more than twice their reserve price.[64]
Jason Fanthorpe, window cleaner: I live two miles from Scott Street bridge and one night one of the local Facebook groups was buzzing with the news that Banksy had painted it. I’m a keen photographer, so got straight down there. It was an ace atmosphere, with busloads of people arriving and taxi drivers bringing people to see it. I had a tingly feeling looking at the mural, and the thought that Banksy had been to Hull and left a political message about Brexit and division on a disused/raised bridge that separates two halves of the city.
The Thekla boat in Bristol was originally tagged by Banksy in 2003. The moored nightclub boat’s owners posted an image of the “tag” on their website and asked their customers whether it should stay. The response was to keep it, but Bristol City Council later ordered its removal. Years after its removal, Banksy returned and re-painted the Grim Reaper in the same spot where it remains to this day. Grim Reaper (Thekla) location
In March, a stencilled graffiti work appeared on Thames Water tower in the middle of the Holland Park roundabout, and it was widely attributed to Banksy. It was of a child painting the tag "Take this—Society!" in bright orange. London Borough of Hammersmith and Fulham spokesman, Councillor Greg Smith branded the art as vandalism, and ordered its immediate removal, which was carried out by H&F council workmen within three days.[69]
When it comes to art, the word "print" can mean a lot of things. First, there's the real deal: lithographs, woodcuts, screenprints, and the like. Even though a printmaker might've produced 20 editions of such a work—that's the penciled-in 6/20 in the bottom corner you'll sometimes see—they also had to make the plate, block, or screen that it came from and then manually print each edition on a press. Sometimes they even tediously tear their own paper to get those amazing unfinished edges! So each one of their "prints" is considered an original work of art, and you'll have to pay for it accordingly. (This is why some original photography can be so expensive; you're actually buying a "silver gelatin print" that was first shot on a camera and then carefully crafted in a dark room.) If you can afford this kind of print, they're amazing pieces to display and collect and you'll be supporting storied artforms in the process. But the other kind of print is one that's specifically useful to know about if you're decorating on a budget, though it sometimes gets a bad rap: the digital reproduction.
With site-specific works like Hammer Boy, Banksy and other street artists encourage viewers to envision urban spaces, surfaces, and objects differently, and to see fun and whimsy in otherwise mundane spaces. In this way, street artists have much the same mentality as skateboarders or people who practice parkour. For all of these groups, city spaces and surfaces are not restricted to their prescribed uses. Instead, participants feel the freedom to co-opt and repurpose the urban environment. A fire hydrant is not just for holding water, it can also become a child's plaything. A handrail is not only for holding and supporting oneself, it can also become a tool for enacting daring acrobatic feats.
In April 2007, Transport for London painted over Banksy's image of a scene from Quentin Tarantino's film Pulp Fiction (1994), featuring Samuel L. Jackson and John Travolta clutching bananas instead of guns. Although the image was very popular, Transport for London claimed that the graffiti created "a general atmosphere of neglect and social decay which in turn encourages crime" and their staff are "professional cleaners not professional art critics".[58] Banksy painted the same site again and, initially, the actors were portrayed as holding real guns instead of bananas, but they were adorned with banana costumes. Some time later, Banksy made a tribute artwork over this second Pulp Fiction work. The tribute was for 19-year-old British graffiti artist Ozone who, along with fellow artist Wants, was hit by an underground train in Barking, east London on 12 January 2007.[59] Banksy depicted an angel wearing a bullet-proof vest holding a skull. They also wrote a note on their website saying:
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The Mona Lisa is perhaps the most famous painting of all time, and it is also one which is often parodied. Banksy is no exception. This re-imagining of Mona Lisa as a terrorist toting a rocket launcher appeared in London. It has been spotted in various locations, but it is unclear as to whether these are copies or if they all belong to the elusive Banksy.
This graffiti piece was produced by Banksy to mark the Queen’s Diamond Jubilee in 2012 and shows a child labourer working to produce union jack bunting in celebration of the event. The work did not last long and was removed in early February 2013. As with “No Ball Games”, Sincura Group were involved in its removal and they claimed to have at least three big bids for the piece. The owner of the store on whose wall the graffiti was placed has never commented. Banksy Slave Labour location.

Banksy is an anonymous England-based street artist, vandal, political activist, and film director.[1] His satirical street art and subversive epigrams combine dark humour with graffiti executed in a distinctive stenciling technique. His works of political and social commentary have been featured on streets, walls, and bridges of cities throughout the world.[2] Banksy's work grew out of the Bristol underground scene, which involved collaborations between artists and musicians.[3] Banksy says that he was inspired by 3D, a graffiti artist who later became a founding member of the English musical group Massive Attack.[4]
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