In August/September 2006, Banksy placed up to 500 copies of Paris Hilton's debut CD, Paris, in 48 different UK record stores with his own cover art and remixes by Danger Mouse. Music tracks were given titles such as "Why Am I Famous?", "What Have I Done?" and "What Am I For?". Several copies of the CD were purchased by the public before stores were able to remove them, some going on to be sold for as much as £750 on online auction websites such as eBay. The cover art depicted Hilton digitally altered to appear topless. Other pictures feature her with her chihuahua Tinkerbell's head replacing her own, and one of her stepping out of a luxury car, edited to include a group of homeless people, which included the caption "90% of success is just showing up."[171][172][173]
Peter Gibson, a spokesman for Keep Britain Tidy, asserts that Banksy's work is simple vandalism,[198] and Diane Shakespeare, an official for the same organisation, was quoted as saying: "We are concerned that Banksy's street art glorifies what is essentially vandalism."[55] In his column for The Guardian, satirist Charlie Brooker wrote of Banksy "...his work looks dazzlingly clever to idiots."[199]
Banksy is believed to be Robin Gunningham, born on 28 July 1973 in Yate, 12 miles (19 km) from Bristol.[15][16][11] Several of Gunningham's associates and former schoolmates at the public Bristol Cathedral School have corroborated this rumour, and in 2016, a study found that the incidence of Banksy's works correlated with the known movements of Gunningham.[17][18][19][20] Lawyers representing Banksy commented on this study, but did not suggest that the paper's conclusions were flawed.[21]
Arguably Banksy’s most iconic piece, it appeared in South Bank, London in around 2002. The words ‘There Is Always Hope’ are written just behind a young girl, who can be seen reaching for a balloon in the shape of a heart. Intense debate has raged on over the years regarding the true meaning of this stencil, with a variety of ideas involving love, innocence and – obviously – hope.
The mural was situated in the line of sight of a CCTV camera. In fact, Banksy managed to erect three stories of scaffolding under the cover of darkness to create the entire artwork in one night. This work aims to criticize the excessive surveillance (both from CCTV cameras in public spaces, as well as in other forms such as online) that has recently become a controversial issue both in the UK and abroad. Banksy has done other works that aim to "tease" security cameras, for instance by stenciling the words "what are you looking at?" on a blank wall faced by a CCTV camera.
The Fine Art Paper we use is acid and lignin free, ensuring the image won't fade over time. The thickness of the paper, which is measured as a weight, is 230gsm (grams per square meter), and is roughly the thickness of 3 sheets of standard photocopy paper put together. This paper type has been selected because of its exceptional print quality, meaning we are able to reproduce high-resolution imagery at museum quality standards. We use digital Giclee printing on our fine art paper.

Artwork description & Analysis: This more recent Banksy work serves as an excellent example of the way that "guerrilla" street artists use the surrounding environment as an integral part of their works. In this work, Banksy has stenciled a simple black silhouette of a child with a large mallet in the process of striking something in front of him. The pre-existing object that the boy is about to hit is a red fire hydrant, which has a pipe coming up through the top leading directly to a round red object several feet higher (possibly a fire alarm). With the inclusion of the small boy with the mallet, this utilitarian plumbing fixture is instantly transformed to look like a "high striker" or "strength tester" (the classic carnival game where a player must use a mallet to hit a lever at the bottom of a tower, with the goal of launching a small puck upwards to hit the bell at the top of the tower). 

The canvas fabric is stretched by hand, a procedure carried out by experienced masters of their craft. Stretched perfectly taut over a quality spruce wood frame, the ready-made canvas will be the perfect item to complement your interior decor. Upload your photo and in a matter of minutes you’ll be able to place your order. It’s an effortless process with a great product at the end of the line!
You could drive from store to store looking for wall art décor. Or, you can shop from the comfort of home on our site, where you’ll find a diverse array of wall art, paintings, prints and photography to decorate any space and appeal to any taste. You’ll be able to look directly at the walls you wish to adorn as you shop, which will unquestionably spark home décor ideas you wouldn’t come up with in a brick-and-mortar store. And, believe us, beautifying your walls can be much more creative than hanging a single framed canvas in the center of a wall.
Where can you position art and photography in a room? Almost anywhere is ideal. One thing to consider is what you want that particular piece to accomplish. Is it a showstopper, your favorite masterpiece? Then, you probably want it somewhere it gets noticed immediately, such as in the center of an accent wall. Above a fireplace is another spot where people tend to look right away when they walk into a room. Other artwork is complementary in nature. Each painting works together to create a harmonious arrangement in the whole room. These vignettes look beautiful on top of console tables, on bookshelves or hanging above furniture.
Once again Banksy has used existing feature to enhance his work. Here the double yellow lines of the road are extended across the pavement and up the wall where they bloom into a flower. The pavement lines have been removed and the painter’s face is mostly obscured with newer graffiti, but the flower is still clear. Yellow Lines Flower Painter location.
There exists a cult-like following for the artist. The ambiguity of his identity has drawn this group of followers. A concept, the "Banksy effect" has developed as a result of Banksy's artistic innovation. This term is in reference to the artist's ability to turn outsider art into the cultural mainstream.[154] It was coined to reference the way in which Banksy's work has led to an increased interest in street art. Street art has been incorporated into being a part of culture and daily life. His work in turn, has questioned the authenticity of art and its creators, furthering the cultural debate that has existed for centuries.[155]
In August 2004, Banksy produced a quantity of spoof British £10 notes replacing the picture of the Queen's head with Diana, Princess of Wales's head and changing the text "Bank of England" to "Banksy of England". Someone threw a large wad of these into a crowd at Notting Hill Carnival that year, which some recipients then tried to spend in local shops. These notes were also given with invitations to a Santa's Ghetto exhibition by Pictures on Walls. The individual notes have since been selling on eBay for about £200 each. A wad of the notes were also thrown over a fence and into the crowd near the NME signing tent at the Reading Festival. A limited run of 50 signed posters containing ten uncut notes were also produced and sold by Pictures on Walls for £100 each to commemorate the death of Princess Diana. One of these sold in October 2007 at Bonhams auction house in London for £24,000.[44]
The material we print on is important for creating effect and has been carefully chosen for compatibility with our digital printers in order to reproduce your art prints to the highest possible standard. We use the following two art print materials when printing art prints of our own published images. King & McGaw canvas art prints are printed on high quality synthetic canvas.

Banksy is an anonymous England-based street artist, vandal, political activist, and film director.[1] His satirical street art and subversive epigrams combine dark humour with graffiti executed in a distinctive stenciling technique. His works of political and social commentary have been featured on streets, walls, and bridges of cities throughout the world.[2] Banksy's work grew out of the Bristol underground scene, which involved collaborations between artists and musicians.[3] Banksy says that he was inspired by 3D, a graffiti artist who later became a founding member of the English musical group Massive Attack.[4]

The Westminster City Council stated in October 2008 that the work One Nation Under CCTV, painted in April 2008 would be painted over as it was graffiti. The council said it would remove any graffiti, regardless of the reputation of its creator, and specifically stated that Banksy "has no more right to paint graffiti than a child". Robert Davis, the chairman of the council planning committee told The Times newspaper: "If we condone this then we might as well say that any kid with a spray can is producing art."[73] The work was painted over in April 2009. In December 2008, The Little Diver, a Banksy image of a diver in a duffle coat in Melbourne, Australia, was destroyed. The image had been protected by a sheet of clear perspex; however, silver paint was poured behind the protective sheet and later tagged with the words "Banksy woz ere". The image was almost completely obliterated.[74]
This is one of the lesser known Banksy pieces in the San Francisco area. It depicts Osama Bin Laden sunbathing. The piece requires a hefty climb to access it but the spot provides beautiful views of the Golden Gate Bridge. It pokes fun at the idea that while the USA was hunting for Bin Laden he was believed to be hiding in the US. Osama Sunbathing location.
Artwork description & Analysis: This mural depicts two young boys playing with buckets and shovels, like children creating sandcastles on a beach. The boys, one standing, the other kneeling, look back at the viewer, rendered in Banksy's typical black and white stencil aesthetic. Just above the boys, the artist has created the illusion of a broken section of the grey wall on which the mural was created. Through this false hole, a photorealistic color image of a tropical beach paradise is visible, with sand, water, and several palm trees.
large metal wall art abstract metal wall art metal signs metal wall decor metal art metal wall art words wood wall art outdoor metal wall art metal wall sculpture custom metal wall art wall decor metal wall art flower metal letters metal wall art mountains wrought iron wall art metal wall art birds modern metal wall art large outdoor metal wall art 
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