Banksy is usually most well known for his 2 dimensional graffiti art, but from time to time his installations also cause something of a stir. This broken telephone box appeared overnight in a Soho street complete with an axe and pool of blood. The piece featured in Banksy’s “Exit Throguh The Gift Shop” film, but did it represent the death of phone communication thanks to the birth of social media or did BT get it right when the embraced the work as a representation of their change away from the iconic red phoneboxes to a more modern design.
I wanted to make sure any buyer would preserve the mural, but then it all kicked off. The phone started ringing day and night. An Australian offered £400,000. Someone from Los Angeles wanted to take the entire wall to California – the house would have fallen down. When the council sent someone to clean it off, the local people went mad and chased them down the street: we were all very protective of the Banksy. But once the news got round, someone broke into the house, smashed it up and chucked buckets of red paint all over the picture. It was ruined, but then every graffiti artist in Bristol wanted to tag it, so it became this collage of graffiti art, with the remnants of the Banksy still visible.
The condemning of street art as illegal vandalism, and its frequent removal, has been the focus of many other works by Banksy. But on the other hand, the fact that many of his works get removed shortly after their creation adds to the excitement and fanaticism that surrounds Banksy's work. Banksy biographer Will Ellsworth-Jones wrote in 2013 that Banksy "is an artist who has got people running around the city desperate to see his work before it gets painted over."
A woman washing zebra stripes was painted by Banksy in the capital city of Mali, Timbuktu and shows a “naked” zebra standing by as his stripes are hung up to dry by an African lady. There appears to be little in the way of any obvious meaning to this piece. It is a playful piece, but maybe the fact that it appeared in the drought-ridden country of Mali and the absurdity of using water in such a frivolous way points to an issue that perhaps the western world could, and should, do more to help impoverished people in the developing world.
Jason Fanthorpe, window cleaner: I live two miles from Scott Street bridge and one night one of the local Facebook groups was buzzing with the news that Banksy had painted it. I’m a keen photographer, so got straight down there. It was an ace atmosphere, with busloads of people arriving and taxi drivers bringing people to see it. I had a tingly feeling looking at the mural, and the thought that Banksy had been to Hull and left a political message about Brexit and division on a disused/raised bridge that separates two halves of the city.
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This item arrived yesterday and was packed well. It was in perfect condition upon removal from the large, flat box. I was surprised at the color of the metal, as I was expecting it to be silver tone. The spikes of the starburst are dark metal, nearly black - that doesn't come through on the picture here. The glass beads are more like large, flat, faceted rhinestones. All in all, a very pretty item. I will keep it, it will be in a grouping of 3 starbursts so it will still look great in my living room.
On Limited, you’ll find emerging artists of note from around the world, such as Cécile van Hanja, Dean West, Jesús Perea, Denise Marts, and many others who have offered exclusive limited edition art prints of their original works. Each print is created using the finest museum quality archival paper and inks, so you can enjoy your artwork for many years to come. Your print will be accompanied with a signed and numbered Certificate of Authenticity. You’ll also have three framing options to choose from, each crafted from solid wood in black, white, and natural wood, so your artwork is ready-to-hang upon arrival.
The printed photo on canvas is then hand-stretched over a simple frame we machine in-house. The stretcher bars of the frame are made of 100 percent pinewood with a solid backing to make sure your canvas never sags. The fabric is then carefully underpinned to the back of the frame by skilled artisans. To finish off the photo canvas print, your choice of hanging hardware is added, and your order is ready to ship with lightning speed.
The introduction of a ‘stop and search’ policy allowing Police to search any young people they deemed may be up to no good was met with much criticism so it is no surprise to see Banksy weigh in on the debate. Policeman Searching Girl appeared in Glastonbury in 2007 showing a young girl with a teddy being frisked by a policeman. It has since been painted out.
This Banksy work was found in Hastings and depicts a young child building sandcastles. This in itself is not controversial, but when we notice that Tesco is printed on the sandcastles it takes on a new meaning. Consumerism is a common theme in Banksy’s work and here he seems to be indicating that the supermarket giant is taking over the country! The artwork is still visible on the Sea wall although it has been defaced by other graffitti artists. Approximate location of Tesco Sandcastle.

The piece can be read in many ways. In one respect, Banksy is advocating for a sexual-identity accepting society by placing icons of authority in a pro-gay position. His use of policemen, rather than ordinary citizens, is intriguing, because the very subjects of his tender portrayal are often the ones to working to eradicate his vandalism. While some believe that he is poking fun at policemen, showing them in a vulnerable, intimate moment, others read the work more positively, as showing a human side to the police force, and emphasizing the strong bonds that exist on the police force between partners and teammates. The work is an undeniable testament to Banksy's use of irony to challenge us to build a bridge of understanding between expected enemies of ideology.
A stencil painting attributed to Banksy appeared at a vacant petrol station in the Ensley neighbourhood of Birmingham, Alabama on 29 August as Hurricane Gustav approached the New Orleans area. The painting, depicting a hooded member of the Ku Klux Klan hanging from a noose, was quickly covered with black spray paint and later removed altogether.[71] His first official exhibition in New York City, The Village Pet Store and Charcoal Grill, opened 5 October 2008. The animatronic pets in the store window include a mother hen watching over her baby Chicken McNuggets as they peck at a barbecue sauce packet, and a rabbit putting makeup on in a mirror.[72]
While he may shelter behind a concealed identity, he advocates a direct connection between an artist and his constituency. “There’s a whole new audience out there, and it’s never been easier to sell [one’s art],” Banksy has maintained. “You don’t have to go to college, drag ’round a portfolio, mail off transparencies to snooty galleries or sleep with someone powerful, all you need now is a few ideas and a broadband connection. This is the first time the essentially bourgeois world of art has belonged to the people. We need to make it count.”

Our canvas prints are top notch in quality. We use gallery-quality textured canvas on a solid front construction so that your artwork will never stretch or sag. Add a frame to finish off your custom canvas print. Our gallery style frames are available in espresso, black, and white colors. Canvas prints come complete with a fully finished backing and frames have mounting brackets attached to make it easy for you to hang your wall art.
Collage.com offers museum-quality canvas prints with a sturdy frame and professional construction so your photos will last for years to come. Choose from a variety of different sizes. Our 5x7 and 8x10 canvases each have a 0.5” thick wrap and include a tabletop stand. All other canvas sizes have a 1.25” thick wrap. A solid black matboard enclosure provides a dust cover and added durability.
On Limited, you’ll find emerging artists of note from around the world, such as Cécile van Hanja, Dean West, Jesús Perea, Denise Marts, and many others who have offered exclusive limited edition art prints of their original works. Each print is created using the finest museum quality archival paper and inks, so you can enjoy your artwork for many years to come. Your print will be accompanied with a signed and numbered Certificate of Authenticity. You’ll also have three framing options to choose from, each crafted from solid wood in black, white, and natural wood, so your artwork is ready-to-hang upon arrival.
The right classy metal wall art can really be a conversation starter and the centerpiece to a complete design and décor scheme. There are few better ways to set off or accent your room, whether you're giving an old room a fresh facelift or you're moving into a brand-new home or apartment and looking for a way to really make each room pop. These affordable and varied designs are the way to go.
Old Skool has always been a firm favorite amongst fans of Banksy’s work. The piece was situated in London’s Clerkenwell Road and showed old people engaging in the type of loitering usually expected from young people! There was some degree of mystery surrounding the piece in 2008 when it was painted over and replaced with a cut out stencil saying “collected” There is some debate as to whether or not the work was removed from the wall or painted over.
By substituting a weapon with a bunch of flowers, Banksy is advocating peace instead of war, and he opted to install this message of peace in a high-conflict area. The work also carries the message that peace comes with active hard work. The bouquet of flowers in this work, in addition to symbolizing peace, life, and love, may also be understood as commemorating lost lives in an age old religious conflict. It is a fine example of Banksy's use of art to relay messages of social importance.

Banksy enjoys putting people and objects in unexpected scenarios and here the usually menacing stormtroopers appear somewhat comical in their setting as camera man an presenters. It seems fitting that this piece was part of a larger mural found in Hollywood – home of the movies! There is still some debate over whether or not this is in fact a Banksy or the work of another artists going by ‘Mr Brainwash’.
In one of the more unusually-placed positions, the white-stencilled words “This is not a Photo Opportunity” appear approximately 40 metres up a steep, rocky path just off Cliff Road (B3135) in the picturesque Cheddar Gorge in Somerset. It first appeared in around 2004 and although it has weathered significantly since then it’s outline is still visible. This is not a Photo Opportunity – approx location
Because of the secretive nature of Banksy's work and identity, it is uncertain what techniques he uses to generate the images in the stencils, though it is assumed he uses computers for some images due to the photographic quality of much of his work. He mentions in his book Wall and Piece that as he was starting to do graffiti, he was always either caught or could never finish the art in one sitting. He claims he changed to stencilling while hiding from the police under a rubbish lorry, when he noticed the stencilled serial number. He then devised a series of intricate stencils to minimise time and overlapping of the colour.
The mural was situated in the line of sight of a CCTV camera. In fact, Banksy managed to erect three stories of scaffolding under the cover of darkness to create the entire artwork in one night. This work aims to criticize the excessive surveillance (both from CCTV cameras in public spaces, as well as in other forms such as online) that has recently become a controversial issue both in the UK and abroad. Banksy has done other works that aim to "tease" security cameras, for instance by stenciling the words "what are you looking at?" on a blank wall faced by a CCTV camera.
An obvious place to begin is with color. One trick of the trade many designers use it to pull an accent color from the rug, window treatments, or upholstery to work into artwork on the walls. In this way, everything in the room is subtly unified, even if you're layering with lots of patterns or experimenting with several different hues at once. Try purple wall art that speaks to the sheer curtains on the windows; violet poppies make this warm shade sing, especially when the floral plaques themselves are placed on an opposite wall.
In May 2009, Banksy parted company with agent Steve Lazarides and announced that Pest Control,[77] the handling service who act on his behalf, would be the only point of sale for new works. On 13 June 2009, the Banksy vs Bristol Museum show opened at Bristol City Museum and Art Gallery, featuring more than 100 works of art, including animatronics and installations; it is his largest exhibition yet, featuring 78 new works.[78][79] Reaction to the show was positive, with over 8,500 visitors to the show on the first weekend.[80] Over the course of the twelve weeks, the exhibition was visited over 300,000 times.[81] In September 2009, a Banksy work parodying the Royal Family was partially destroyed by Hackney Council after they served an enforcement notice for graffiti removal to the former address of the property owner. The mural had been commissioned for the 2003 Blur single "Crazy Beat" and the property owner, who had allowed it to be painted, was reported to have been in tears when she saw it was being painted over.[82]
There exists a debate about the influence behind his work. Some critics claim Banksy was influenced by musician and graffiti artist 3D. Another source credits the artist's work to resemble that of French graffiti artist called Blek le Rat. It is said that Banksy was inspired by their use of stencils, later taking this visual style and transforming it through modern political and social pieces.[190]
Categories: BanksyLiving people20th-century English paintersEnglish male painters21st-century English paintersArtists from BristolCulture jammingEnglish activistsEnglish contemporary artistsEnglish film directorsEnglish graffiti artistsEnglish satiristsGuerilla artistsPolitical artistsPseudonymous artistsStreet artistsAnti-consumeristsUnidentified peoplePranksters
As the feud developed, Banksy painted over work by King Robbo, one of London’s earliest graffiti writers. Painting over the work of a fellow graffiti writer was seen as unforgivable and Robbo’s crew responded by defacing the new Banksy. A tit-for-tat war ensued – even continuing after Robbo’s untimely death - as his crew continued to target Banksy works across the capital. Robbo’s largely urban, underground, working class team saw Banksy as a mainstream, middle class imposter.
Once again Banksy has used existing feature to enhance his work. Here the double yellow lines of the road are extended across the pavement and up the wall where they bloom into a flower. The pavement lines have been removed and the painter’s face is mostly obscured with newer graffiti, but the flower is still clear. Yellow Lines Flower Painter location.

Just like with the classic art canvas found in galleries around the world, the canvas photo print of your choice is stretched to fit the frame perfectly. When preparing your chosen photo, make sure that the elements you most want to see in the final product aren’t too close to the margins, otherwise they may not be displayed properly on the finished canvas!
For perhaps obvious reasons, digital reproductions can be frowned upon in the art world. Part of that is because they discourage originality—think of how many dorm rooms are decorated with a poster of Monet's Water-Lilies because the campus bookstore sells them for $10—but mostly it's just snobbery. Art prints aren't considered original art, so some people look down on them. [Insert extremely long pause here.] Are you wondering, Why the hell would I care if something's "original art" if it's cute and inexpensive and the artist is happy to sell it to me?? Well, same, thankfully. Lots of artists produce and sell art prints for way less than their originals as a way to make some cash flow but also to just get their art out in the world to more people. You're still supporting them by buying one of these if you can't afford the real thing! Once simply framed, digital prints can look super spiffy and finished in any room in your house. A gallery wall starts to look way more doable if you shop for art prints instead of originals! And you don't have to end up with some cheesy reproduction of an old-timey piece that hangs in the Louvre (those tend to be called "fine art prints" if you're trying to avoid them).
In April 2007, Transport for London painted over Banksy's image of a scene from Quentin Tarantino's film Pulp Fiction (1994), featuring Samuel L. Jackson and John Travolta clutching bananas instead of guns. Although the image was very popular, Transport for London claimed that the graffiti created "a general atmosphere of neglect and social decay which in turn encourages crime" and their staff are "professional cleaners not professional art critics".[58] Banksy painted the same site again and, initially, the actors were portrayed as holding real guns instead of bananas, but they were adorned with banana costumes. Some time later, Banksy made a tribute artwork over this second Pulp Fiction work. The tribute was for 19-year-old British graffiti artist Ozone who, along with fellow artist Wants, was hit by an underground train in Barking, east London on 12 January 2007.[59] Banksy depicted an angel wearing a bullet-proof vest holding a skull. They also wrote a note on their website saying:
The Thekla is such a hub for Bristol’s music and creative community that it’s almost certain Banksy would have come to gigs and parties here. He also had his first Bristol exhibition at the nearby Severnshed bar, so was definitely spending time in the vicinity. There’s always been talk that there were also a couple of his famous rat stencils inside the venue at some point, but they were long gone when I arrived in 2006.
The piece can be read in many ways. In one respect, Banksy is advocating for a sexual-identity accepting society by placing icons of authority in a pro-gay position. His use of policemen, rather than ordinary citizens, is intriguing, because the very subjects of his tender portrayal are often the ones to working to eradicate his vandalism. While some believe that he is poking fun at policemen, showing them in a vulnerable, intimate moment, others read the work more positively, as showing a human side to the police force, and emphasizing the strong bonds that exist on the police force between partners and teammates. The work is an undeniable testament to Banksy's use of irony to challenge us to build a bridge of understanding between expected enemies of ideology.
According to some sources, his real name would be Robin or Robert Banks but, again, nothing is certain. Banksy insists stubbornly on remaining anonymous, as the graffiti’s spirit that involves creating artworks in the purest secret. His art is a mixture of irony, irreverence, humor and often contains very clear messages, in the context where they are not interpreted literally.
Banksy held an exhibition called Barely Legal, billed as a "three-day vandalised warehouse extravaganza" in Los Angeles, on the weekend of 16 September 2006. The exhibition featured a live "elephant in a room", painted in a pink and gold floral wallpaper pattern, which, according to leaflets handed out at the exhibition, was intended to draw attention to the issue of world poverty. Although the Animal Services Department had issued a permit for the elephant, after complaints from animal rights activists, the elephant appeared unpainted on the final day. Its owners rejected claims of mistreatment and said that the elephant had done "many, many movies. She's used to makeup."[47] Banksy also made artwork displaying Queen Victoria as a lesbian and satirical pieces that incorporated art made by Andy Warhol and Leonardo da Vinci.[48]

Where can you position art and photography in a room? Almost anywhere is ideal. One thing to consider is what you want that particular piece to accomplish. Is it a showstopper, your favorite masterpiece? Then, you probably want it somewhere it gets noticed immediately, such as in the center of an accent wall. Above a fireplace is another spot where people tend to look right away when they walk into a room. Other artwork is complementary in nature. Each painting works together to create a harmonious arrangement in the whole room. These vignettes look beautiful on top of console tables, on bookshelves or hanging above furniture.
Banksy is no stranger to controvery, but sometimes it is not the pieces of his art you would expect that prove to be the most divisive. Tox is one of those pieces. In June 2011, graffiti lover Daniel Halpin, aka Tox was convicted of tagging multiple locations over a three year period. The prosecution mocked him as ‘no Banksy’ due to a lack of artistry in his tagging. In response Banksy put up the piece which shows a little boy writing ‘Tox’ in bubbles. Opinion is split as to whether this is a show of solidarity or being used to poke fun at Halpin. Location of Tox.

Once again Banksy has used existing feature to enhance his work. Here the double yellow lines of the road are extended across the pavement and up the wall where they bloom into a flower. The pavement lines have been removed and the painter’s face is mostly obscured with newer graffiti, but the flower is still clear. Yellow Lines Flower Painter location.
The last time I hit this spot I painted a crap picture of two men in banana costumes waving hand guns. A few weeks later a writer called Ozone completely dogged it and then wrote "If it's better next time I'll leave it" in the bottom corner. When we lost Ozone we lost a fearless graffiti writer and as it turns out a pretty perceptive art critic. Ozone – rest in peace.[60]
Banksy is no stranger to controvery, but sometimes it is not the pieces of his art you would expect that prove to be the most divisive. Tox is one of those pieces. In June 2011, graffiti lover Daniel Halpin, aka Tox was convicted of tagging multiple locations over a three year period. The prosecution mocked him as ‘no Banksy’ due to a lack of artistry in his tagging. In response Banksy put up the piece which shows a little boy writing ‘Tox’ in bubbles. Opinion is split as to whether this is a show of solidarity or being used to poke fun at Halpin. Location of Tox.

There exists a debate about the influence behind his work. Some critics claim Banksy was influenced by musician and graffiti artist 3D. Another source credits the artist's work to resemble that of French graffiti artist called Blek le Rat. It is said that Banksy was inspired by their use of stencils, later taking this visual style and transforming it through modern political and social pieces.[190]
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Collage.com offers museum-quality canvas prints with a sturdy frame and professional construction so your photos will last for years to come. Choose from a variety of different sizes. Our 5x7 and 8x10 canvases each have a 0.5” thick wrap and include a tabletop stand. All other canvas sizes have a 1.25” thick wrap. A solid black matboard enclosure provides a dust cover and added durability.
He loves to provoke, shock even to disturb society and that is why his work is so important. Despite his ability to break the rules, he remains to this day a mystery since his true identity has never been revealed. In all likelihood, Banksy is a Street art graffiti artist from Bristol, England. Philanthropist, anti-war and revolutionary, the artist uses his art as a medium for communication to say loud and clear his dissatisfaction with certain social phenomena, certain political situations or outright certain decisions adopted by world leaders. Born tentatively in 1974, it was not until the 1980s that he began to handle the aerosol, after completing a butcher training. But it was between 1992 and 1994 he became truly a graffiti artist, as part of a group called the Bristol's DrybreadZ Crew (DBZ), assisting his colleagues Kato and Tes.
Check out a dazzling scope of unusual wall art, whether that's a fish sculpture or a set of inspiring plaques. You'll instantly establish a certain mood that sweeps up everything around you, from the switchplates down to the door mat. Dive into a collection of affordable wall art, and come away with a piece that changes a humdrum space into a lively setting.
Use a pencil to mark the designated hanging spot for your framed wall decor. Use a level when installing hardware to ensure your art will hang straight. The center of the print should be about 60 inches off the floor. Allow for 6 to 8 inches of space between the bottom of the frame and the top of any furniture beneath it. Hire a professional to hang heavy or hard-to-maneuver frames.
Custom canvas prints are crafted with the excellence that will gain the attention of every person who passes by. They allow you to happily relive life’s milestones such as weddings and graduations. But they also allow you to showcase the awesome photos you took on vacations and candid precious moments you caught of children and pets. Canvas picture prints add an eye-catching focal point to the empty space on your wall. If you need help coming up with artistic and unique ideas for your photo to canvas, please visit our idea gallery for interesting ways to create collages and other forms of canvas photo printing.
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Breathe life into your walls! Give your decor a unique touch with our posters and prints, and allow our poster art to take center stage. Put a personal stamp on your home, and let the posters and prints you pick reflect who you are as a person or something you like. Easily create an attractive gallery by combining several different posters in a collage. Check out our Inspiration category to see popular gallery walls that feature our chic posters.
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