Après le travail de finition des pinceauteuses, certaines pièces recevaient un apprêt. Composé d'un mélange de cire et d'amidon, il était appliqué sur la toile qui passait ensuite à la calandre à chaud. Pour satiner ces pièces elles étaient lissées à la bille d'agate ou de cristal fixée à l'extrémité d'un bras articulé - le lissoir. A partir de 1770, l'impression à la planche de cuivre gravée en creux permit les impressions monochromes, ce fut le début des scènes à personnages qui ont rendu si célèbres les toiles de Jouy. En 1797, un brevet écossais de 1783 fut mis en application, l'impression au rouleau de cuivre. La machine fonctionnant en continu permettait la production de 5000 mètres par jour. C'était un gain de temps considérable par rapport à la planche de cuivre.
Banksy is an anonymous England-based street artist, vandal, political activist, and film director.[1] His satirical street art and subversive epigrams combine dark humour with graffiti executed in a distinctive stenciling technique. His works of political and social commentary have been featured on streets, walls, and bridges of cities throughout the world.[2] Banksy's work grew out of the Bristol underground scene, which involved collaborations between artists and musicians.[3] Banksy says that he was inspired by 3D, a graffiti artist who later became a founding member of the English musical group Massive Attack.[4]
In March 2010, the work Forgive Us Our Trespassing was displayed at the London Bridge in conjunction with Art Below an arts company that put on art shows on the London Underground. The work was censored by the Transport for London (TfL), forbidding display of the work with its halo, because of the prevalence of graffiti in the underground.[87] It was displayed without the halo over the boy's head, but after a few days the halo was repainted by a graffitist, so the TfL disposed of the poster. This decline went through the press and several articles were published remarking on the progress of the poster.[87][88]
In March, a stencilled graffiti work appeared on Thames Water tower in the middle of the Holland Park roundabout, and it was widely attributed to Banksy. It was of a child painting the tag "Take this—Society!" in bright orange. London Borough of Hammersmith and Fulham spokesman, Councillor Greg Smith branded the art as vandalism, and ordered its immediate removal, which was carried out by H&F council workmen within three days.[69]
Among the structures photographed prior to the opening were a large pinwheel by Banksy,[10] Horse Scaffolding Sculpture by Ben Long,[11] and a twisted truck sculpture, Big Rig Jig by artist Mike Ross which was previously shown at Burning Man in 2007.[12][13][14] Works by 58 artists, including Jenny Holzer, Damien Hirst, Jeff Gillette, Jimmy Cauty and Bill Barminski were featured in the park.[4] Banksy said he contacted the "best artists I could imagine" to exhibit, with two artists turning him down.[15]
×