At first one had to alight at the nearby town of Verton on the main line to Calais, but in 1893 a 1,000 mm (3 ft 3 3⁄8 in) metre gauge branch line was built connecting it with other towns in the region. As well as carrying passengers, there was also goods traffic from the brick-works at Berck Ville. Known locally as le Tortillard for its wandering route, it was closed in 1955.[10] There was a later narrow-gauge line running northwards through the dunes from Berck Plage to Paris-Plage, as Le Touquet was then known. It was built in stages via Merlimont between 1909-12 but gradually sanded over and closed in 1929.
Après le travail de finition des pinceauteuses, certaines pièces recevaient un apprêt. Composé d'un mélange de cire et d'amidon, il était appliqué sur la toile qui passait ensuite à la calandre à chaud. Pour satiner ces pièces elles étaient lissées à la bille d'agate ou de cristal fixée à l'extrémité d'un bras articulé - le lissoir. A partir de 1770, l'impression à la planche de cuivre gravée en creux permit les impressions monochromes, ce fut le début des scènes à personnages qui ont rendu si célèbres les toiles de Jouy. En 1797, un brevet écossais de 1783 fut mis en application, l'impression au rouleau de cuivre. La machine fonctionnant en continu permettait la production de 5000 mètres par jour. C'était un gain de temps considérable par rapport à la planche de cuivre.

The steady sea breezes and the updraft created by the neighbouring dunes once made the town the centre of a number of aeronautical experiments. These began in the final decades of the 19th century with early trials of photography from unmanned kites. Among the first working locally was the English meteorologist E.D.Archibald in 1887; he was followed the next year by Arthur Batut and during 1889-91 by Emile Wenz.[20] The experiments continued until 1914 and some of the photos found commercial use on postcards.[21]


In March, a stencilled graffiti work appeared on Thames Water tower in the middle of the Holland Park roundabout, and it was widely attributed to Banksy. It was of a child painting the tag "Take this—Society!" in bright orange. London Borough of Hammersmith and Fulham spokesman, Councillor Greg Smith branded the art as vandalism, and ordered its immediate removal, which was carried out by H&F council workmen within three days.[69]
Among the structures photographed prior to the opening were a large pinwheel by Banksy,[10] Horse Scaffolding Sculpture by Ben Long,[11] and a twisted truck sculpture, Big Rig Jig by artist Mike Ross which was previously shown at Burning Man in 2007.[12][13][14] Works by 58 artists, including Jenny Holzer, Damien Hirst, Jeff Gillette, Jimmy Cauty and Bill Barminski were featured in the park.[4] Banksy said he contacted the "best artists I could imagine" to exhibit, with two artists turning him down.[15]
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