In spring 2019, students from The MIT Borderline Mural Project participated in the painting and augmented reality development for a mural in the Suffolk County South Bay House of Corrections. The project is a collaboration between The Suffolk County Sheriff’s Department and several groups at MIT, including Music and Theater Arts, The Educational Justice Institute (TEJI), and Arts at MIT. Funding for was provided by the MIT Office of the Vice Chancellor and The Council for the Arts at MIT. Pioneered and produced by Co-director of TEJI Carole Cafferty, SCSD Teaching Artist Peggy Rambach and SCSD Director of Women’s Programming Christina Ruccio, the project was also made possible through the leadership of Suffolk County Sheriff Steven W. Tompkins and Superintendent Yolanda Smith. The January IAP painting workshop was directed and taught by Sara Brown, Senior Lecturer with MIT Music and Theater Arts. Organization and student engagement were conducted by Sam Magee, Manager of Student Programs for the Arts at MIT.
Other world-famous murals can be found in Mexico, New York City, Philadelphia, Belfast, Derry, Los Angeles, Nicaragua, Cuba and in India. [1] They have functioned as an important means of communication for members of socially, ethnically and racially divided communities in times of conflict. They also proved to be an effective tool in establishing a dialogue and hence solving the cleavage in the long run. The Indian state Kerala has exclusive murals. These Kerala mural painting are on walls of Hindu temples. They can be dated from 9th century AD.
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