Contrairement à un tirage photo classique qui, exposé en pleine lumière, jaunira après quelques années, un tirage d'art a une longévité exceptionnelle d'environ 100 ans. Ces tests de longévité sont opérés par des instituts spécialisés indépendants comme le Wilhelm Research Institute sur la combinaison des encres pigmentaires et des papiers d'art sélectionnés par Artdeqo.
Following in their footsteps came the sons of local families who, until about 1914, constituted what has been called 'the Berck School'.[30] These included Francis Tattegrain, who was encouraged to take up art by Lepic;[31] Jan Lavezzari, son of the town architect who was also a friend of Lepic;[17] Charles Roussel (1861–1936), who settled in the town in 1886;[32] and Eugène Trigoulet (1864–1910).[33] After World War I the town and its inhabitants continued to be represented artistically by Roussel and by Louis Montaigu (1905–1988).[34] Fishermen in interiors were a speciality of the latter.[35]
The artist’s initial mural was a portrait of a woman painted on a friend’s chimney. The piece went viral, and Grammer—who is a Disney artist now living in Los Angeles—knew that more mural art was in order. “I’ve always had this deep heart to bring hope and joy through my art with deep and destructive issues,” he explained to news channel KRCR. “When the first mural on Clark Road moved so many people in this community emotionally I knew I had to come back up.”

Beside its medical establishments, the beach quarter catered to the moneyed classes in the second half of the 19th century and slowly filled with grandiose villas, hotels and amenities. Among these were handsome casinos, of which the principal was the Eden, also known as the Grand Casino de la Plage, with its theatre and music hall. This was destroyed in 1944 but is survived by its equally gorgeous rival, the Kursaal.[15] The ambitious Cottage des Dunes, which tried to unite a luxury hotel and casino, failed commercially in 1913. After a brief spell as a hospital, it entered into official use.[16] Another official building that survived the bombing was the town hall, which was built in 1893 and has murals painted by Jan Lavezzari.[17]
The church of Saint Jean Baptiste was restored in 1954 and the 15th century carvings on its corbels were then highlighted in paint. The choir and belfry are now listed monuments.[13] The new church of Notre-Dame des Sables was opened in 1886 on the marketplace of the beach quarter. Its seating for 1,500 was to cater principally for holiday makers in season and the patients from the many medical establishments profiting from the sea air. There are paintings on the choir walls.[14]

Banksy displays his art on publicly visible surfaces such as walls and self-built physical prop pieces. Banksy no longer sells photographs or reproductions of his street graffiti, but his public 'installations' are regularly resold, often even by removing the wall they were painted on.[5] A small number of Banksy's works are officially, non-publicly, sold through Pest Control.[6] Banksy's documentary film Exit Through the Gift Shop (2010) made its debut at the 2010 Sundance Film Festival.[7] In January 2011, he was nominated for the Academy Award for Best Documentary for the film.[8] In 2014, he was awarded Person of the Year at the 2014 Webby Awards.[9]
“Banksy is unique to the art world. No other artist captures the hearts and minds of the public like he does,” Syer said. “What this person today seems to have done is needlessly ruin a print worth around £40,000 and reduce its value to almost nothing…[there] are limited numbers of Girl With Balloon prints in the world, today, we lost one and it's a crying shame.”
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The public art mural program administered by the Beaverton Arts Program as part of its commitment to public art. The Beaverton City Council voted in April 2008 to exempt all public art from the city’s sign code and create a public art program for display of art on public rights of way and on private building facades and other private property under the terms of easements to be granted to the city for that purpose.
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