For over 30 years, Mural Arts has united artists and communities through a collaborative process, rooted in the traditions of mural-making, to create art that transforms public spaces and individual lives. Mural Arts engages communities in 60–100 public art projects each year, and maintains its growing collection through a restoration initiative. Our core program areas—Art Education, Restorative Justice, and Porch Light—yield unique, project-based learning opportunities for thousands of youth and adults.
The Borderline Mural Project covers a 200 foot long wall in the tunnels under the campus of MIT with murals and magic. The tunnel is a commonly used route between MIT Buildings 66 and E17 during bad weather. A useful connection between point A to point B,  Borderline aims to make the tunnels a destination. The magic comes in the form of augmented reality: viewers can use the Artvive mobile phone app to experience an extension of the imagery.
Many home owners choose to display the traditional art and culture of their society or events from their history in their homes. Ethnic murals have become an important form of interior decoration. Warli painting murals are becoming a preferred mode of wall decor in India. Warli painting is an ancient Indian art form in which the tribal people used to depict different phases of their life on the walls of their mud houses.
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