A unique community participatory art initiative is a collaboration between DBHIDS and the City of Philadelphia’s Mural Arts Program (MAP) as well as local artists, behavioral health service recipients, community members, providers, local funders and academic partners. Porch Light represents an “out-of-the-box” approach to improve community resilience and wellness, as well as an innovative way for communities to improve their understanding of behavioral health conditions.
All Saints' Church Bristol Cathedral Bristol Community Church Buckingham Baptist Chapel Chapel of the Three Kings of Cologne Christ Church, Clifton Down Christ Church with St Ewen Church of All Saints, Clifton Church of Holy Trinity, Hotwells Church of Holy Trinity, Stapleton Church of the Holy Trinity with St Edmund Church of St John the Baptist City Road Baptist Church Cotham Church Counterslip Baptist Church Clifton Cathedral Crofts End Church Holy Trinity Church, Kingswood Holy Trinity Church, Westbury on Trym New Room Pro-Cathedral of the Holy Apostles St Mary Redcliffe Redland Chapel St. Augustine's Church, Whitchurch St Augustine the Less Church St George's Church St James' Priory St John the Baptist St Luke's Church St Mark's Church St Mary le Port Church St Mary on the Quay St Mary's Church, Henbury St Matthew's Church St Michael on the Mount Without St Nicholas St Peter and St Paul St Peter's Church, Bishopsworth St Peter's Church, Castle Park St Philip and St Jacob St Stephen's Church St Thomas the Martyr St Werburgh's Church St Paul's Church Temple Church Trinity Centre Whitefield's Tabernacle, Kingswood Whitefield's Tabernacle, Penn Street Woodlands Christian Centre

The public art mural program administered by the Beaverton Arts Program as part of its commitment to public art. The Beaverton City Council voted in April 2008 to exempt all public art from the city’s sign code and create a public art program for display of art on public rights of way and on private building facades and other private property under the terms of easements to be granted to the city for that purpose.

I have enjoyed watching street art and creative graffiti grow over the last 30 years (I'm a 60 year old grandma). Banksy has raised the bar so much higher. His earlier work was strongly English, with commentary on uniquely British foibles, but every year it has expanded to lambast ridiculousness everywhere. I especially loved his rat series, which was brilliant.

Digital techniques are commonly used in advertisements. A "wallscape" is a large advertisement on or attached to the outside wall of a building. Wallscapes can be painted directly on the wall as a mural, or printed on vinyl and securely attached to the wall in the manner of a billboard. Although not strictly classed as murals, large scale printed media are often referred to as such. Advertising murals were traditionally painted onto buildings and shops by sign-writers, later as large scale poster billboards.

The last time I hit this spot I painted a crap picture of two men in banana costumes waving hand guns. A few weeks later a writer called Ozone completely dogged it and then wrote "If it's better next time I'll leave it" in the bottom corner. When we lost Ozone we lost a fearless graffiti writer and as it turns out a pretty perceptive art critic. Ozone – rest in peace.[60]
“Banksy is unique to the art world. No other artist captures the hearts and minds of the public like he does,” Syer said. “What this person today seems to have done is needlessly ruin a print worth around £40,000 and reduce its value to almost nothing…[there] are limited numbers of Girl With Balloon prints in the world, today, we lost one and it's a crying shame.”
It was reported that then-New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg called Banksy a vandal whose work is not the definition of art, and that the NYPD's vandal squad was on the hunt for Banksy over his various graffiti art and installations.[114][115][116] One creation was a fiberglass sculpture of Ronald McDonald and a real person, barefoot and in ragged clothes, shining the oversized shoes of Ronald McDonald. The sculpture was unveiled in Queens but moved outside a different McDonald's around the city every day.[117][118][119] Other works included a YouTube video showing what appears to be footage of jihadist militants shooting down an animated Dumbo; travelling installations that toured the city including a slaughterhouse delivery truck full of stuffed animals and a waterfall; and a modified painting donated to a charity shop which was later sold in an online auction for $615,000.[120][121] Banksy also posted a mock-up of a New York Times op-ed attacking the design of the One World Trade Center after the Times rejected his submission.[122][123] The residency in New York concluded on 31 October 2013;[120][124] many of the pieces, though, were either vandalised, removed or stolen.[125]
Banksy, who "is not represented by any of the commercial galleries that sell his work second hand (including Lazarides Ltd, Andipa Gallery, Bank Robber, Dreweatts etc.)",[67] claims that the exhibition at Vanina Holasek Gallery in New York City (his first major exhibition in that city) is unauthorised. The exhibition featured 62 of their paintings and prints.[68]
Banksy is an anonymous England-based street artist, vandal, political activist, and film director.[1] His satirical street art and subversive epigrams combine dark humour with graffiti executed in a distinctive stenciling technique. His works of political and social commentary have been featured on streets, walls, and bridges of cities throughout the world.[2] Banksy's work grew out of the Bristol underground scene, which involved collaborations between artists and musicians.[3] Banksy says that he was inspired by 3D, a graffiti artist who later became a founding member of the English musical group Massive Attack.[4]
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